Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3

    Default Dutch Door twist lock replacement

    Hello all -
    I have scoured the internet and I cannot find a twist lock for a dutch door. All I find are sliding bolts. My front door is about 85yrs old, possibly more. Never seen anything like it anywhere. Photo's attached. The lockset has never been fully operational. Door won't open from the outside and as the knobs are missing to control the locks from the inside, the door remains permanently locked. Locksmiths have run away. Carpenters seem baffled. No one seems to have the knowledge or resources to fix this door. I am looking not only for replacement locks, but someone with the knowledge to install them.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,386

    Default Re: Dutch Door twist lock replacement

    It's not really clear from your photo, but I think they used a privacy lock to secure the two halves of the door; it was like a small mortise deadbolt operated from one side with a thumbturn.
    You can probably find a replacement on ebay; search antiques/architectural/hardware
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Dutch Door twist lock replacement

    It's difficult to load photo's with such small file size. Your description sounds familiar - ie: thumb turn. There were 2 thumb turns on this door at one time. But the rosettes were small and the attachment holes for those rosettes wore away over time.

    Are you saying this is just a small deadbolt I could find anywhere, but it was installed vertically instead of horizontally?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,386

    Default Re: Dutch Door twist lock replacement

    Is it only the thumbturns that are missing? There are a pair of them on ebay right now for $6.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Dutch Door twist lock replacement

    Yes I would say via process of elimination that it is "thumbturns" that are missing, but the wood is also worn away, so even if I was just to buy a thumb turn you mention with the small plate, it will fall out of the door, more critical for the lower lock than the upper as there is no way to attach. As you can see there is also a big chunk of wood missing from the door above the lower hole (the lower hole is the main dead bolt for the whole door) .

    Inside both holes, the lock hole looks like a four petal flower. Is this standard?

    The glass knob also sticks and turns counter clockwise to open, rather than clockwise.

    This is a lock issue in an antique door.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,386

    Default Re: Dutch Door twist lock replacement

    You can use a router to cut a grave to inlay a patch around the old thumbturn location. Rout 1/4" deep, use 1/4" wood to fill the grave.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,743

    Default Re: Dutch Door twist lock replacement

    From the pic it looks like the RH door has a normal mortise-type lockset set yertically instead of horizontally. Look under the door and see if it looks familiar. Those can be found or repaired and pricey reproductions can be had. The LH door may be similar but with the slip-plunger removed installed normally (Horizontal bolting). These mechanisms are simple so remove the knob, pull out the shaft, and remove the lock. A few screws hold the case together and opening it will show you how it works.

    The usual problem is weak or broken springs, or a broken part. Of the springs many were leaf-sprung. You can make those but it's an in-depth project. Coil springs can be replaced with some scrounging. Take the old spring to a mechanic or appliance repairman to see if they can match it. Don't ask at the service counter; they will have no clue what to do and will just say you can't get it anymore. Perhaps a locksmith can find springs but they prefer replacing the assembly. If it's a broken part the best thing to do is scrounge another or replace the lock. It could be repaired but it won't be as good as the original part which broke anyway so it couldn't have been terribly good from the start.

    With hardware and a house this old you need to hone your scrounging skills if you want to retain originality because most things are vastly different now- so much so that they will be unusable for restoration purposes. Part of being a good 'scrounger' is spotting things and getting them ahead of time so that when something breaks, you've already got a replacement.

    BTW, the 'cloverleaf' you describe is 4 drilled holes close together to allow something bigger than the drill bit to fit or pass through, or to create a squarish enough hole to do the job instead of a chiseled mortise. Even 100 years ago Carpenters took shortcuts and adapted the tools they had to do the job at hand when they didn't have all the right tools- a practice that continues to this day in my trade!

    I know it's not really specific but I hope my information helps.

    Phil
    Last edited by Mastercarpentry; 03-13-2012 at 06:14 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •