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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2

    Default New interior stairs

    I am replacing wall to wall carpeting on inside stairs which are built with 2x treads and plywood risers. I want to replace with Southern Yellow Pine treads and 1x pine risers. What's the best method to end up with nice quiet stairs? Do the risers set on the treads or do the treads butt up against the risers? Should I use Liquid nails, wood glue or something else on the treads? Any help will be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: New interior stairs

    if you want squeak free stairs, the best method is to install the risers first then the tread..working your way up the stairs.. drive screws though the back of the riser into the back of hte tread to lock it together.. use construction adhesive for the treads on the stringer and the riser.. wood glue for the tread to riser connection
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: New interior stairs

    thanks - i'll give that a try

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,109

    Default Re: New interior stairs

    I agree with jkirk, except that I use a polyurethane adhesive for everything now- it offers superior adhesion and flexibility compared to other adhesives in this usage. By carefully controlling the bead of glue (position and amount), squeeze-out will be minimal. After fastening a tread scr-ape any squeeze-out off carefully with a sharp chisel. Let whatever is left dry and sand clean before applying stain and finish.

    If you've been keeping up with TOH on TV, you've seen Tom Silva now installs stair treads with polyurethane adhesive and a few finish nails. This glue holds so well it does all the work; the finish nails just hold everything in place till it dries. I've been doing the same for about 6 years with no failures and no squeaks yet. I've had to replace a few damaged treads and they are a bugger to get apart, splintering both pine and oak treads instead of the glue joint separating, so I'd say this way works pretty darn well!

    Phil

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