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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default How to begin renovating a poured cement garage

    We bought a 100 year old home located on a hill with a detached poured cement garage built into the hill below it. As far as we can tell, the garage is as old as the house. The roof has hairline fractures and needs to be sealed; the garage door needs to be replaced; the electric needs updating. We are not sure which to do first. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,751

    Default Re: How to begin renovating a poured cement garage

    You want to start on the exterior and work your way inside. So of the three things you mentioned, the roof would be the first to get attention. Then the garage door and finally the electrical.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,716

    Default Re: How to begin renovating a poured cement garage

    dj1's plan sounds about right. Or if you are like me you'll end up working on all three to some degree at the same time.
    It is nice to finish one thing before moving on if possible.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: How to begin renovating a poured cement garage

    Those old concrete garages are pretty cool. They were built because they were fireproof and were usually detached form the home. Since only and idiot would store a gasoline powered horseless carriage in a building attached to the home.

    My neighbour has the same type of garage. The roof is used as a patio and overlooks the river. His had a passage below ground to access the house.

    I agree, you have to fix the leaks in the roof first, then work on the garage door so it's functional, then upgrade the electrical. Outdated electrical tends to get more attention that needed. People usually only have problems with old wiring when they overload it, or it's poorly installed or been modified. New wiring can be equally or more dangerous if not installed correctly.


    Just a good quality caulk might seal those cracks. Or you might consider coating the concrete roof with an epoxy floor coating material. Those have some flexibility and may prevent hairline cracks from causing leaks in the future.
    1925 Two-Story Stucco Beaux Arts Neoclassical

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