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Thread: crown moulding

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    1

    Default crown moulding

    Can you tell me why when putting up crown mouldins you say to put the moulding in upside down, putting the top on the table base. I would think this would cause problems with wrong cuts. Please let me no i am going to start a large moulding job and never heard of this.

    Thank You
    Greg J

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Northern Virginia
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    975

    Default Re: crown moulding

    You position the molding upside down in the chop saw because it is a lot easier to hold it that way. It fits in the corner formed by the saw fence and table. If you have a compound saw, you can cut the molding laying flat on the table by using the specific positions (30.4 and 38 degrees) on the angle scale, Most better chop saws have these angles marked and many have detents for them.
    There's even an article here featuring our beloved Norm (all hail Norm)
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    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    6,481

    Default Re: crown moulding

    It will become self evident when you start trying to cut your crown why it is put in the saw in a certain manner. Orientation in the saw will depend on whether you're cutting an inside or outside corner.

    What I recommend you do is forget about right side up, upside down, backwards, and every other direction and start by cutting yourself some template blocks for an inside and an outside corner. The template blocks will remove ALL of the guess work out of the equation, making it impossible for you to make a wrong cut. Once the templates are cut, mark them as to being an inside left, inside right, outside left, or an outside right.

    And because the written word is harder to understand than pictures and videos, I would recommend you look at YouTube for some vids on the subject for clarification.

    Also, you may want to consider coping your inside corners because they have less of a tendency to open up with expansion/contraction.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    nova scotia, canada
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    Default Re: crown moulding

    the upside down and backwards method works for saws that arent dual compound mitre saws.. by having it upside down and backwards you merely have to set the saw to 45 degrees on the mitre. on a dual compound mitre saw crown can be cut on the flat.

    some trim carpenters swear by the upside down and backwards method, others swear by cutting it on the flat. its just a matter of what your taught and feel most comfortable with
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,096

    Default Re: crown moulding

    Quote Originally Posted by jkirk View Post
    the upside down and backwards method works for saws that arent dual compound mitre saws.. by having it upside down and backwards you merely have to set the saw to 45 degrees on the mitre. on a dual compound mitre saw crown can be cut on the flat.

    some trim carpenters swear by the upside down and backwards method, others swear by cutting it on the flat. its just a matter of what your taught and feel most comfortable with
    I do this both ways, depending on the size and type of saw as well as the size of the molding. A smaller saw or too-wide molding may not allow the upside-down method so you have to cut flat. It's good to learn both ways. Some saws have accessory "Crown Stops" which hold the molding in the bed consistently, or you can just get it right through trial and error and draw a line where it's right.

    Don't let it intimidate you- crown molding isn't really that hard to do as long as you're only dealing with 90 degree corners and measure carefully- it's when other variables are involved that it gets a bit tricky. Cut all your long pieces first and fit them. If you get one too short you can cut it down to fit a smaller run without any loss of lumber.

    Phil

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