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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1

    Question Water feed location to house

    I need to locate the water supply line from my water well to where it enters my house. I have crawled in the crawl space, dirt under wooden floors, and am unable to determine where the water enters under the house or where it branches off to the rooms supplied with water.
    Any suggestions on determining which of the many pipes under the house is the main supply line.
    I have very poor water pressure which I hope will be resolved when I install a pvc water line from the well to the house. Thanks for your input.....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: Water feed location to house

    The best answer I can think of is to go to your water heater (or water ever receives the potable water) and follow the supply line to the edge of the foundation. Most systems allow cold potable water to branch off to different fixtures at the water heater and to run parallel to the hot supply. I would think that following the water line from the tank (or boiler) to the foundation would be the best option. I hope that helps!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: Water feed location to house

    Poor water pressure in old homes is usually from the inside of galvanized water pipes corroding and reducing the inner diameter. SO a 3/4" line becomes more like a 1/2" line and 1/2: lines don;t flow more than 3/8".

    The restriction being at the main is as likely as anything. But t's just a likely that all the piping needs to eventually be replaced.

    I'm slowly replacing all of our water piping. One of our bathrooms upstairs has lower water pressure... guess what, it's the only bath that still has all the originl piping.
    1925 Two-Story Stucco Beaux Arts Neoclassical

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Water feed location to house

    To find the waterline, divine it.

    Make a divining rod from a wire coat hanger by cutting at the base of the hook and at the opposite corner. What you should be left with is the lower rung and one arm of the hanger. Straighten the bend to 90* and you've got yourself a divining rod.

    Crook your elbow at 90* so that your forearm is parallel to the ground and hold the short end of the divining rod loosely in your fist so that it may swing freely. The long arm of the divining rod should be held parallel to the ground.

    Turn on a hose bib at the house or an interior faucet then return to the well head and start divining. The divining rod will swing in the direction of the water flow. Once you find your target at the well, you can walk back and forth across the line and follow it up to the house.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: Water feed location to house

    I apologize for my post.....I thought you meant finding where it enters the house and from there to the rooms. Sorry!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Water feed location to house

    Most plumber would have piped it from the well straight across to the home in the shortest distance with the least amount of fitting because of cost so with that being said 90% of the times that's how I find them there is equipment you can use to locate it depending on the type of material but if your replacing it why don't you just dig up the old and follow it to the house and you will know exactly where it enters and you can put the new in the same hole.

    Ben & Munson Mech Plumbing
    300 N 100 W, Lehi, UT 84043
    (801) 960-1766 ‎

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,081

    Default Re: Water feed location to house

    Jim has the right answer. Plumbers will always use as little materials the can get away with. So a straight line from the well to the house.

    Near the house the pipe should not be very deep, so searching for it is relatively easy. When digging, be carful not to bust it.

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