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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19

    Question Extending a Loft

    My current home was originally build with a loft and I wish to extend the loft completely across making a second floor - and create two new bedrooms, and a full bath. The loft floor is framed with 2x6s to an existing double 2x12 beam. I will basically be removing the entire loft, and reframing the entire floor system.

    The span is a simple span ~18+/- and I have sized the joists for the span and deflection. I was planning on using either open joists (to ease running HVAC) or using wood i-beams. What is the best way to connect to the existing outside wall structure? Is is better to simply hang the i-beams to the top plate with hangers (keeping i-beams in line with the studs)? Or even go as far as a ledger board with hangers? The exterior walls are 2x6 framing.

    Thanks!

    Brian

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Extending a Loft

    Howdy, the best way is to set the joist on top of the wall plate.
    Otherwise i would install a rim joist, opening the wall to revel the studs, then lag bolting it to every stud and install joist hangers on the rim joist. The local building department can guide you to how large of lag bolts to use- or a helpful lumber counter person...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Extending a Loft

    I thought about that, too. I have to take down some drywall to see how the wall is constructed, as its 18' high in the area I am extending into. I was unsure if that would cause a problem as the beam would not sit directly on a stud. I thought about sistering the studs, but that would require a lot more electrical issues with rerunning wire.

    I might go the rim joist method - I remember sizing screws, but have to find my notes.

    Thanks for the reply.

    Brian

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Extending a Loft

    Hi if you open the walls, the top plate of the wall is likely doubled to bear the upper level of the home. If it is doubled then a joist on it and not over the stud should not affect its bearing ability.

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