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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Question Water hammer AFTER pressure reducer installed

    I live in a single home that used to be a double. The two upstairs bathrooms were just remodeled - new tub and shower units in both bathrooms. The shower head on the right side of the house would drip when the tub was filled. So my contractor called Delta and was told to install a pressure reducer, which he did. Three days after that, I now have a severe water hammer when the washer or toilets on the right side of the house are used. (Not when I run the faucet or downstairs shower, just when the toilets are flushed or washer is used.) There is only one water main coming into the house. Is the pressure reducer faulty, or was it installed incorrectly? Oh, and the shower head still leaks when the tub is filling. Again, only on the right side.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Water hammer AFTER pressure reducer installed

    As far as the shower head dripping when your filling the tub. Did your contractor use PEX or CPVC pipe? I'm betting he did. You can not use PEX or CPVC between the valve body and the tub spout. Both PEX and CPVC have a smaller ID that cause a restriction in the line to the spout forcing some water to the shower head. The directions with the Delta faucet say not to use CPVC or PEX. As far as the water hammer they may not have fastened the lines correctly. That can be solved with hammer arrestors.

    John

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Water hammer AFTER pressure reducer installed

    Also: Pressure reducer valves have arrows for in and out flows, so they are not installed incorrectly. Checking what the installer has done to verify, is a good idea.

    Check the water pressure exiting the reducer too. Chances are that a new reducer is fine, but once a little while it could be defective, you never know.

  4. #4
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    Dec 2007
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    Default Re: Water hammer AFTER pressure reducer installed

    I don't think the water pressure reducer is faulty or installed incorrectly, but it is the source of your problem. I don't know if you are on a well or city water, but somewhere in your system, you have an accumulator, which is basically an air bubble. This is used to absorb the shock wave of the water being abruptly shut off. The pressure reducer was likely installed after the accumulator so anything upstream of the pressure reducer is not affected by the accumulator.

    The pressure reducer was probably not needed, I think that you just need a new shower valve. Removing the pressure reducer will solve the waterhammer issue, but it may cost more to have the plumber remove it than it would to install a new accumulator. You can get small ones at a hardware store for about $11 each. You will need two of them, one for the hot and one for the cold. The best place to install them is at the washing machine. Just shut off the water, remove the hoses, install the waterhammer breaker (accumulator) on the faucet and reconnect the hoses. They will protect the toilet as well.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Smile Re: Water hammer AFTER pressure reducer installed

    Thanks for all the replies; I am on city water and they didn't use PEX or CPVC - it was copper tubing.

    It did seem to me that the pressure reducer created more problems than it solved. I think I will just add a shut-off valve to the shower head so it can't drip and then have them remove the pressure reducer valve.

    I also like the accumulator idea - that's something I can do myself and it's cheap in case they want to charge me for removing the pressure reducer valve.

    Thanks again for the help! I'm glad I posted!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Water hammer AFTER pressure reducer installed

    Quote Originally Posted by kjp View Post
    Thanks for all the replies; I am on city water and they didn't use PEX or CPVC - it was copper tubing.

    It did seem to me that the pressure reducer created more problems than it solved. I think I will just add a shut-off valve to the shower head so it can't drip and then have them remove the pressure reducer valve.

    I also like the accumulator idea - that's something I can do myself and it's cheap in case they want to charge me for removing the pressure reducer valve.

    Thanks again for the help! I'm glad I posted!
    I don't think removing the PRV valve will solve the problem with the shower. dj1 may have hit the nail on the head by saying the valve body may be installed up side down.
    John

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