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Thread: Drywall height

  1. #1
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    Default Drywall height

    I'm remodeling and the studs are 94 5/8 inch. Any suggestion what I should do for drywall? Should I get one 54 inch and one 48 inch and just rip one or is there a better option? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Drywall height

    48" + 48" = 96". Either lay it horizontal & cut a little off or go vertical and cut a little off. I have never seen 54" wide gyp board.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Drywall height

    Quote Originally Posted by ed21 View Post
    48" + 48" = 96". Either lay it horizontal & cut a little off or go vertical and cut a little off. I have never seen 54" wide gyp board.
    Ditto.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Drywall height

    The pre-cut studs are that size for a reason;

    When framing new construction, a sole plate of one 2x4 and a double top plate are part of the wall construction. Each 2x4 is 1.5" totalling 4.5" added to the 92 5/8" studs = 97 1/8". Once the ceiling is drywalled, subtract 1/2" for most residential and 5/8" for commercial leaving behind 96 1/2" give or take. That leaves 1/2" of slack space for installing the sheets of drywall and discrepencies in framing.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Drywall height

    Quote Originally Posted by ed21 View Post
    48" + 48" = 96". Either lay it horizontal & cut a little off or go vertical and cut a little off. I have never seen 54" wide gyp board.
    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    Ditto.
    Double ditto !!
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Drywall height

    Quote Originally Posted by HoustonRemodeler View Post
    The pre-cut studs are that size for a reason;

    When framing new construction, a sole plate of one 2x4 and a double top plate are part of the wall construction. Each 2x4 is 1.5" totalling 4.5" added to the 92 5/8" studs = 97 1/8". Once the ceiling is drywalled, subtract 1/2" for most residential and 5/8" for commercial leaving behind 96 1/2" give or take. That leaves 1/2" of slack space for installing the sheets of drywall and discrepencies in framing.
    If it's a non bearing wall there's likely only one top plate added with the bottom plate = 3.5 inches added to the length of the 92 5/8 studs totals 96 1/8.
    It's pretty commom to see 5/8 gyprock for ceilings ( unless it's high density 1/2 inch ) in residential --- subtract the 5/8 and you're at 95 1/2 there abouts.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Drywall height

    That is stud length then add bottom plate and dbl top plate putting the total 99 1/8 inch. Thanks

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Drywall height

    Drywall is available in different widths to accommodate varying wall heights. 54" is commonly used in houses with 9' (nominal) ceilings.

    You're probably not going to find it in your big-box HouseMart, but check with some local lumberyards and they can probably get it for you.

    If you do end up ripping down a wide sheet, install horizontally with the cut edge at the bottom. That way the tapered factory edges will meet mid-wall so you can get a flat joint. Stagger the end joints so they don't line up vertically -- that helps prevent a bulge at a 4-way corner.

    Other way is to just use 48", push one up to the ceiling & the other to the floor. Then fill in the gap in the middle with 3/8" drywall.

    And in case anyone's wondering why you go horizontal rather than vertical -- it cuts in half the number of joints you have to tape over your head.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Drywall height

    as just mentioned about putting one sheet up to the ceiling and one down to the floor then filling in between, this is to make taping easier. by having a filler strip inbetween you only have to make one large pass over the two seams as opposed to having two seams to tape midway and at the bottom

    regarding 54" sheets. it can be purchased however its highly unlikely you'll be able to get it at a big box store. you'll probably have to order it straight from a drywall supplier which manufacture and sell it directly to the end user
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Drywall height

    Yep -- in that case hang the top and bottom sheets and cut a filler strip for the middle. I don't know about using the 3/8 for the filler strip though. I've never seen any rockers do it that way. Seems it would be a heck of a build up of mud to fill and feather out the joint. The same thickness of filler strip is generally used --- at least that's the way I've seen and learned.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

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