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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12

    Default Double Hung Sash Windows

    My windows currently have the rope and pulley system. I'm wondering if there is something better available to keep the windows open.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    boston,ma
    Posts
    114

    Default Re: Double Hung Sash Windows

    If you are trying to preseve the look of the home these windows can be repaired, the pulleys and sash cords are still available, most people in colder climates just replace them with thermo-pane windows which are way more efficient. If you want to keep the wood windows you can buy jamb liners and weather stripping and make these windows tighter, there are tons of options for you to consider at this point, if you just want the window to work then replace the sash cords and pulleys if necessary. you have to remove the inside stops and remove the inside sash to acsess the weight boxes at the bottom of the window jamb, then its just replace whichever parts are defective. I have added some thin felt to the inside of the sashes, and to the parting bead, if the windows were really drafty, that seemed to work untill I eventually replaced all the windows with triple pane low e-3 windows which shaved 1/3 off my heating bill. Good Luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: Double Hung Sash Windows

    In good condition, no other balance system is as simple or works as well as ropes & pulleys. Everything else uses different variations of springs. That means varying tension, slow loss of force, and usually more friction.

    IF weighted properly the sash is perfectly balanced, so the only thing holding it in place is some friction against the sides and the latch holds it closed. Actually I think it's usually set-up so the weights are slightly heavier than the sash, since it's easier ot close a window than open it.

    What's wrong with yours?
    1925 Two-Story Stucco Beaux Arts Neoclassical

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Double Hung Sash Windows

    Overall, the windows are in fairly good condition. I have changed the ropes before on a few of them. Was just wondering if there is a better system available.

    Was also considering vinyl windows to retain more heat, but then my building would lose character.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    boston,ma
    Posts
    114

    Default Re: Double Hung Sash Windows

    There are little options for your windows except replacing whats defective, if you say your windows are in good shape then you can just restore them to keep the period look. You can tighten them up significantly with some thin felt weather stripping and some sash seals, and possibly just add some removable storm windows if you have a harsh winter. I have new vinyl windows and hate the look, even though I ordered them with 2x3 muttons and wood clad exterior, they go great with the new vinyl siding, but don't do much for the age of the home which was early 20's cape style. They also have jamb liners and you buy new wood insulated glass window sashes to fit you openings, but it is quite expensive, If what you have is working for you, then just restore them one by one and restore there function. There are plenty of options for you, be careful when sanding or scraping those old windows, especially if you have children around, do it away from the house if possible, and wear a good dust mask, use a drop cloth to collect the derbis, most windows painted before the 1980's may have lead paint on them. Good Luck!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    72

    Default Re: Double Hung Sash Windows

    I have a turn of the century victorian house w/ cedar clapboard siding that had all of the original windows with the rope and pulley system. The sashes were very loose and rattled in the breeze. I got tired of the cold air and frost on the windows and opted for a jamb-liner/sash kit. I knew I didn't want to opt for vinyl in my historic home (nothing against vinyl...I have them in another property). I meticulously measured the windows to order the replacements. I removed the stops and sashes, installed the plastic jamb liners..replaced original stops, etc., and installed new wood, double-paned thermal windows. Painted everything (except jamb liners) to match original. I am very happy with the finished product...both look and efficiency. The only thing I'm missing is the "wavey" glass of the originals

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: Double Hung Sash Windows

    Quote Originally Posted by Paragon42 View Post
    Overall, the windows are in fairly good condition. I have changed the ropes before on a few of them. Was just wondering if there is a better system available.

    Was also considering vinyl windows to retain more heat, but then my building would lose character.
    A low-E storm window will give you energy savings nearly as good as a replacement window for about 1/4 the installed price or less. They also block more noise than a replacement window. A company called "Allied Window", mane ones that are a little more expensive, but have even lower profile frames.
    1925 Two-Story Stucco Beaux Arts Neoclassical

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Double Hung Sash Windows

    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    A low-E storm window will give you energy savings nearly as good as a replacement window for about 1/4 the installed price or less. They also block more noise than a replacement window. A company called "Allied Window", mane ones that are a little more expensive, but have even lower profile frames.
    I just came across Allied Window. I'm thinking it will be much more ideal to install interior storm windows.

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