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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    8

    Default Replacing old Hallway Window

    I have a old hallway window facing out of the house so it is exposed to outside elements - weather,sun,rail,snow etc.
    I wanted to replace it as it being old but the architect told me not to since it was one of the beautiful old ones.

    All the glasses broke and i am rethinking of my decision to replace it again.
    1. What kind of window should i be considering.
    2. Are there any things that i should be doing to increase its lifespan since it faces outside the like aluminum siding or anything else.
    3. What is the approximate cost.

    Loki.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,915

    Default Re: Replacing old Hallway Window

    Quote Originally Posted by Loki View Post
    I have a old hallway window facing out of the house so it is exposed to outside elements - weather,sun,rail,snow etc.
    I wanted to replace it as it being old but the architect told me not to since it was one of the beautiful old ones.

    All the glasses broke and i am rethinking of my decision to replace it again.
    1. What kind of window should i be considering.
    2. Are there any things that i should be doing to increase its lifespan since it faces outside the like aluminum siding or anything else.
    3. What is the approximate cost.

    Loki.
    Were it me (and it's not) I'd first consider who sees the window from the outside and where from. If it is alone with no other windows nearby, and if it is where most people won't see it (such as in back or toward one neighbor only) then I'd consider a new vinyl replacement for economy, or a higher grade metal-clad or fiberglass framed replacement as the best option. Either will lower maintenance considerably. The cost varies by window type, area, and other factors such as accessibility (first or second floor etc.). A low end ballpark figure would be $2-300. That could go up to $1000 in a worst-case situation with a best window option.

    If the window is visibly important to your homes style and character, you might do well to consider repairing what you've got. That cost should be on the low end or what a replacement would cost. Though it will require continued maintenance this way, you can seriously err when you alter the historical aspect of older homes where history matters. You don't want that window to look like a wart on your home's face! The main thing with old wood-framed windows is to maintain them vigilantly. Do that and they will last nigh-on forever; neglect it and it gets costly fast. This is mostly painting and glazing which almost anyone can handle, and those are basic-level homeowner skills for a DIY'er.

    I am a great fan of replacement windows but they don't belong in every situation. In the end you are the one who lives with your choice so make it wisely knowing what you're doing and you'll be fine.

    Phil

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    116

    Default Re: Replacing old Hallway Window

    If it not a window you open/close much or at all, why not have it refurbished and install a single panel storm window on the outside? You can keep the character and historical value and have it protected (with some additional thermal insulation).

    If you operate it much, you can put a traditional tracked storm window outside that you can also open. It would have "cross bars" where the panes meet that would obscure the old window somewhat but you could open it.

    Good luck!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: Replacing old Hallway Window

    IT may still be cheaper to have it restored. Cna you take photos. It depends on hte cosntruction style. ALL glass can be replaced. IF it's leaded glass, there are places that can restore those. A lto of leaded glass windows are work of art. Woudl you throw away a beautiful oil painting form a famous artist because it got some water damage, is a little dirty and so on... NO. Uless the frame has compeltely rotted apart and is beyond repair, it's easily salvageable. Historic windows just need a little TLC every 50-80 years. That's 20-30 longer than most replacement windows even last.

    TO energy efficiency and long term protection, you can have a custom storm window panel made that fits on the outside. The best are made by Allied Window. You cna even get laminated glass which absorbs sound really well, shatter proof lexan or acrylic or Low-E glass that will reduce infrared heat transmission.

    All repalcement windows... even $1000 ones will have a smaller window opening and won't last as long as the original when restored.

    For good custom window that may look similar and of good quality, expect to spend $1000 or more and #00-500 to replace it.
    1925 Two-Story Stucco Beaux Arts Neoclassical

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