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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Post Copper to PVC Bathroom Sink Drain

    I need to connect my new 1 1/4" PVC drain/trap to the existing copper pipe coming out of the wall. I have 1 1/4" copper, then a fitting, then a 2" copper pipe which goes into the wall. Attempted to rubber boot the 1 1/4" PVC to the 1 1/4" copper but that leaked. How do I do this properly? How do I get the fitting off if I need to connect to the 2" copper?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    6,614

    Default Re: Copper to PVC Bathroom Sink Drain

    If I'm seeing that image correctly, you have two nuts, one on the 2" pipe and another around the 1-1/4" pipe. This should be a slip joint. By removing the smaller pipe nut, you can remove the remainder of the old 1-1/4" drain and allow you to install the new one. It's called a slip joint because the smaller pipe slides inside of the larger one. A nylon or rubber ring will seal the joint when the nut is tightened.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Default Re: Copper to PVC Bathroom Sink Drain

    Since its copper pipe, these nuts are soldered on right?

  4. #4
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Copper to PVC Bathroom Sink Drain

    The 2" pipe nut probably is, the smaller one should not be, unless installed by someone who didn't know any better.

    Hold the larger nut with pliers/wrench while trying to turn the smaller nut (counter-clockwise ). This will prevent breaking anything in the wall.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Default Re: Copper to PVC Bathroom Sink Drain

    I couldn't open your picture, but from what you are describing, you are trying to go from 1-1/4" to 2". Correct?

    You can do it by using a 'tubular drain connector', which is a rubber reducer with two stainless steel clamps.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Copper to PVC Bathroom Sink Drain

    What he has is 1-1/2 copper with a 1-1/2" x 1-1/4" chase fitting. Just do as Spruce suggested. Remove the 1-1/4" slip nut and install a new 1-1/4" trap.

    John

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Copper to PVC Bathroom Sink Drain

    Quote Originally Posted by johnjh2o View Post
    What he has is 1-1/2 copper with a 1-1/2" x 1-1/4" chase fitting. Just do as Spruce suggested. Remove the 1-1/4" slip nut and install a new 1-1/4" trap.

    John
    In that case, yes !

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Copper to PVC Bathroom Sink Drain

    Thanks, I was able to remove the slip joint nut and install a new 1 1/4" PVC. However, I have two leaks.

    1. Between the PVC nut (screwed onto the 1 1/2" copper fitting) and the PVC pipe that goes though that nut into the wall. The more I tighten it, the faster the drip. Do I need to put thread tape on the copper threads or some other sealant?

    2. Between the large rubber grommet from the downpipe and the bottom of the sink. It seems that maybe my sink isn't quite level on the surface it interfaces to or maybe the hole isn't completely round because when the grommet goes into the hole, the downpipe isn't centered. Can I add silicon or something to seal around the grommet and bottom of the sink. I've tried two different grommets. The new one fits much better but I still have an occasional drip.

    It won't let me attach any more pictures. If you would like to see pictures please email me at my user name at AOL.
    Thanks, Stephanie

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,614

    Default Re: Copper to PVC Bathroom Sink Drain

    Those plastic cone washers can be a real pickle because they can't conform like a rubber washer will. What I normally do in situations like this is to set the plastic cone washer within 1/8" of where it will be by installing it on the pipe and inserting it into the wall neck to the proper depth (set by the alignment of the trap to the drop tube from the sink ). Make sure the nut is on before you do this. Once you get the cone washer in place, give it 3 or 4 wraps with teflon tape and tighten the nut down. The tape will smoosh into the gaps that the washer can't. If it still wants to leak after that, I'll use a little Rectorseal thread sealant along with the teflon tape and that will usually do the trick.

    It is important to say that the pipe must be clean and free of defects, price tags, or production stamps where the cone washer and nut are as these things will cause a leak. When using teflon tape, you want to keep it flat and neatly wrapped all the way up to tightening the nut, and wrap it in the direction of tightening the nut. When using thread sealant, you want to use enough to evenly coat the area in question, you DO NOT want to gob it on for it to ooze out and make a mess everywhere.

    Your second issue of the drop tube not centering with the rubber washer installed. This frequently happens and you just have to make the best of it. The rubber washer is soft, so it should distort and crush into all the areas it needs to be in to create a seal.

    With all connections, you need them only to be just tight enough that they don't leak. The more you torque on them, the more you'll distort the pipe and the less likely you'll achieve a seal.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

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