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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Maryland
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    5

    Smile Insulate Garage Wall adjoining House

    I would truly appreciate any advice anyone could offer on insulating the walls of our garage. The wall of the house adjoining the garage is always freezing cold in winter and warm in summer. The interior of the wall on the house side seems to be a thick, uneven (not smooth) coat of painted cement. The rooms adjoining the garage are a laundry room and half-bath, which though heated are freezing in winter. We live in a 1952 brick Cape Cod with an attached single garage. The interior of the garage walls are made from cement blocks and some bricks. What we would like to do is insulate these walls, especially the one adjoining the house. Can we attach say 2x2's to the cement block (with nails or screws?); then fit pieces of that dense, rigid styrofoam between these small studs, and finally apply a sheathing, over the studs and styrofoam, such as 0.25 inch plywood that can be painted? Do I need to install any type of vapour barrier? If so, where? Should I use pressure treated lumber for the studs given that it's in the garage? There are no moisture issues.

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Needham, MA
    Posts
    559

    Default Re: Insulate Garage Wall adjoining House

    in massachusetts you have to use PT wood wherever cement comes in contact with wood. first cover the wall (on the garage side) in plastic. if you have the space, i would cover the wall with rigid foam insulation and tape all the joints, then frame out a 2x4 wall, again if you have the space, and use r19 insulation in the stud bays, frame the 2x4 wall basically up against the rigid foam insulation. that should give you plenty of insulation. if you don't have the space, just attaching 2x2's to the wall and filling the bays with rigid foam will definitely help alot, but not as good as it could be.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    5

    Question Re: Interior walls Laundry Room & Half Bath

    Hello MLBSF,
    Almost three years ago you responded to my first ever question on the TOH Discussion site and I was truly grateful I have subsequently posted another question on a different topic but sadly received no responses.
    I am going to go out on a limb and ask you, given your kindness in the past, and especially given your expertise and skills. And, of course, no pressure to reply. Here goes:

    The walls of our laundry room and half bath, in our 1952 brick Cape Cod have a layer (minimum 1/4 inch and thicker)of some sort of plaster/cement that's been trowled on in a very haphazard manner. It's all lumps and dips with no attempt made to make it smooth or flat. This coating is skimmed over walls that are made from a mix of brick and cinder block.
    Question is, can I remove it? I've given it a go in a particular thick spot and it does come off. Why do I need to take it off? It's ugly and uneven and painted with a hideous pale pink colour in high gloss! Thing is, the house is very small and applying some sort of covering over this mess would take up too much room, causing problems with doors opening, etc.
    Can I go around and chip the coating off? I know it will take time but that precious 1/4 inch+ would be needed to apply a smooth coating over the walls, or to apply some sort of covering over the brick and cinder blocks once revealed.
    Anyone got any bright ideas and tips how to remove this cement/plaster stuff efficiently? And, what would you suggest be applied to the walls once cleaned off so that the walls are smooth. I would like to rehang a cabinet so that it is flush with the wall vs. jutting out at odd angles due to the horribly uneven texture of the walls, given their current condition.
    Thanks!
    Lynda


    Quote Originally Posted by MLBSF View Post
    in massachusetts you have to use PT wood wherever cement comes in contact with wood. first cover the wall (on the garage side) in plastic. if you have the space, i would cover the wall with rigid foam insulation and tape all the joints, then frame out a 2x4 wall, again if you have the space, and use r19 insulation in the stud bays, frame the 2x4 wall basically up against the rigid foam insulation. that should give you plenty of insulation. if you don't have the space, just attaching 2x2's to the wall and filling the bays with rigid foam will definitely help alot, but not as good as it could be.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,611

    Default Re: Insulate Garage Wall adjoining House

    Theucter,

    If you can suffer the loss of 1 1/4 inch, I would consider furring out the wall and putting dry wall up. You would end up with a much more finished look without the mess of trying to remove that coating and then having to apply some new type of finish. The window and door can be built out with a 1 1/4 inch strip around the jambs, or, the dry wall could be wrapped inward to form a shadow box recess around them.

    It is not clear if this is the same cold garage wall which you originally addressed. If so, even 3/4inch foam board behind the drywall would greatly improve the coldness of the totally uninsulated block wall.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    5

    Default Laundry room walls coated in troweled on cement

    ordjen,

    thank you for responding. I should have changed the title of my request. Please see above. If you read my latest question again, I hope it will make much more sense.

    There is simply not enough room to build out the wall to accomodate a 1.25 inch build out especially next to the backdoor. Hence my hairbrained plan to chip off all that stucco/cement crud.

    I guess I cannot 'see' what you mean about building out the jambs around the door (yep, I'm a bit of an arse). How would that work if the door currently, including it's handle, BARELY miss striking the wall when it is opened. Guess I could leave a strategically placed divot in the drywall to accomodate the handle, OR remove the trim from that side of the door completely? I thought that might look odd and may likely require the incorporation of that handle divot anyway.

    This generates just a couple more questions (please bear with me!).
    1. the furring strips would be 0.75 inches thick and the drywall 0.5 inches thick - correct?
    2. what would be the best method to attach the furring strips to the walls given that crud?
    3. and, I would have to use shims in order to make the strips perpendicular to the ceiling and floor because of the wavy walls - correct? (otherwise the drywall wood look like a disaster).

    I am anxious to learn/be able to do this myself. Thanks in advance..........

    Tcheucter

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