+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5

    Exclamation High Ground water

    My fiance and I recently bought an older home in an area with high ground water. The soil is very heavy clay and the majority of the town is quite flat. This causes any rain and run-off to soak in and disipate quite slowly.
    Due to this, our sump pumps run every 2 minutes for weeks on end. In a summer dry spell(3-4 weeks of no rain) they slowed down to about once every 2 hours or so. If I had known this was the case, we would have never bought the house, but we didnt and now we are stuck for sometime. We love everything else about the house, but the potential for a flood disaster from pump/power failure causes much stress and lost sleep.
    My question is, is there a way I can lessen the effects of this at all? Would some sort of curtain drain around the house help? How deep can I install one of these? If I were to put some curtain drains in very deep, like 4-6 feet below the surface, would that work? There is a drainage ditch on the back side of our property, but we have a shallow front ditch with no storm drains. We do have sewer and municipal water lines in the front.
    Any other ideas? I have already extended the downspouts and sealed the gutters and also regularly clean all the debris out of the gutters...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5

    Smile Re: High Ground water

    Thanks for reading and any advice you may have.

    John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: High Ground water

    Do you have a basement? Is this what is flooding?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,583

    Default Re: High Ground water

    If there is sufficient drainage to the back of the lot, a french drain would obviously help drain away the excess water, but this would not be cheap.

    How far does the sump pump outlet dump away from the foundation? If it is close to the foundation wall, it will just keep re-cyling. Try extending the outlets further away if possible, especially in the direction of what downward slope there is. I would definitely try this before the french drain. A few sections of plastic pipe is a lot cheaper than a french drain. However, be sure that the pipe is sloped so that water cannot form a low spot. If you are in a freezing climate, you may get an ice blockage and have your sump pump burn out.

    Also, there are battery powered back-up pumps that will only come on should the primary pump fail. They will also give you a warning signal that a problem exists and give you time to make repairs. It is not a bad idea to have a replacement pump handy too. Depends on how much you have down there to lose! My first house had a deep basement and I saw it flood twice in one week-end as the Edison power went out.

    One last thing, most check valves make a loud noise when slapping shut. There are some on the market that greatly reduce this objectional noise.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: High Ground water

    We do have a large basement, half of which is finished. It hasnt flooded yet, but with multiple sump pumps that run constantly, Im concerend of a power failure, what the result will be. I think most of the ground water is coming from across the street(which is slighly higher than us.) There is a also a creek that runs semi-parelell to the road.

    Im thinking that the water will saturate the gravel backfilled area that holds the sewer mains in the street. It follows these underground paths and infiltrates my and neighbors' properies.

    Thanks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: High Ground water

    In places with high ground water, builders are usually advised to not put in a basement. Thats why we don't have basements around here.

    If you want to solve this problem with drains, then you need a place close by that is lower than the floor of your basement, otherwise you have no place to drain to. Around here, there is a company called Olsham that advertises that they can waterproof your basement. Odd advertisement since basements around here are so rare, but those few that do exist do have problems with water.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,583

    Default Re: High Ground water

    Jak,

    I worried about power failures too after my basement flooded twice. I subsequently bought the battery back-up pump and a generator.The back up pump will give you several hours, but if you're without power for a prolonged period, it is comforting to know there is some power available for your house in general, not just the sump pump.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •