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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default squggily bulbs verses flood light squgglies

    installing compact floorisant bulbs in recessed ceiling light cans and wondering if any difference verses the encapsulated ones that look like a flood light ? Is the light shine different or the color of light ...
    Any an all of my comments are just my opinion and not to be confused with facts.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Tennessee
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    1,381

    Default Re: squggily bulbs verses flood light squgglies

    The "encapsulated" bulbs have a reflector built into them that will direct more of the light into the room. Not only will you get more light, but the recessed can should stay a little cooler and the bulb will last longer.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    2

    Default Re: squggily bulbs verses flood light squgglies

    Wanted to mention that Home Depot is now private labeling Lighting Science Group's BR30 LED bulbs under their EcoSmart brand and they are awesome compared to the BR30 CFLs...

  4. #4
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    Mar 2009
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    Default Re: squggily bulbs verses flood light squgglies

    thanks for the help.
    Any an all of my comments are just my opinion and not to be confused with facts.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: squggily bulbs verses flood light squgglies

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
    installing compact floorisant bulbs in recessed ceiling light cans and wondering if any difference verses the encapsulated ones that look like a flood light ? Is the light shine different or the color of light ...
    Plain CFL's are $3-$4 each (less with subsidy). The R40 CFL's are $8-$9, but the bulb cover is so much better asthetically looking that I have them. Women don't want to see naked bulbs.

    CFL's now have different color temperatures - 2700k "warm" (traditional yellow), 3500k (white) and 5000k (very white - operating room) and 6500k (bluish white - my daughter calls it spaceship). To my eyes, 4100k or 5000k is the best but women hate it because it shows facial details while older people still prefer 2700k traditional. For comparison, regular filament bulbs are 2700k and halogens slightly whiter at 2900k. To me, I can't see white until 3100k-3500k.

    I've seen 2700k R40's for $5, but I use 5000k temperature so paid $9 each. Home Depot also has 3500k bulbs. The R30's are a little less expensive and have lower light output, typically 1,100 lumens rather than 1500-1600 for R40's.

    Home Depot also have the R20's accent (very recessed) in 2700k or 5000k (again, I use 5000k for my eyes).

    Most CFL's take 1-2 minutes to glow to full light -- I have 9 R40 CFL's in my kitchen and it's dim for 2 minutes until warmed. They're not for frequent on/off duty.

    The bulb lens reduces the light output but the built-in reflector & silver body directs more light down -- they're rated about the same as a regular spiral - 23w = 1500-1600 lumens.
    Last edited by Brookworld; 12-20-2011 at 09:35 AM.

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