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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5

    Question Wood stain on too long...

    I've left a wood stain on a piece of furniture I've stripped and now stained for more than 48 hours by mistake. How do I remove the stain now? ...how do I remove the stain without having to start all over?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,617

    Default Re: Wood stain on too long...

    Read the label on the stain, it should tell you how to clean up dried stain. This method can be used to remove the excess. Whether or not you'll have to start over will depend on the stain, the clean-up method, and the tenacity with which you try to clean it up.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Wood stain on too long...

    Unfortunately, the label is gone from the can. Must have fell off in the move. Anyway, I'm going to sc**** and wash, and sand and wash and hope I get it all off.

    Thanks, Spruce!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,622

    Default Re: Wood stain on too long...

    Try washing it with paint or lacquer thinner. That usually works.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,617

    Default Re: Wood stain on too long...

    If you know what the brand/type of stain was to begin with, a quick check on-line or at the hardware store will give you your answer, otherwise give Jack's method a shot.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,611

    Default Re: Wood stain on too long...

    JLMCDaniel is correct. After such a long drying time, mineral spirits may no longer lift the stain. If not, try lacquer thinner. I would use tufts of fine steel wool dripped in the solvent and rubbed with the grain. Wipe the residue raised with rags or clean paper towels. Be careful with the rags, they are highly flammable until dry! Also make sure your work area is well ventilated with possible ignition sources turned off. Lacquer thinner and acetone are quite flammable and explosive when concentrated. If an even more aggressive solvent is neccessary, progress to acetone.

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