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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Default Plumb door/Leaning wall

    I recently replaced a front entry door with a new pre-hung unit and have not been able to resolve the inside trim issue. I read the many threads and comments on the subject, and some apply to me. The outside wall leans in at the top about 1/2" to 5/8". The jamb is flush with the wall at the bottom. In order to plumb the wall to the jamb I would have to taper several jacks and studs, and the header with a chisel. This would weaken the structure.
    The aluminum door sill is the width of the jamb and cannot be moved back the 1/2" or so because it would expose a gap between the brick veneer and siding. If not for that I could add a jamb extension to the front behind the brick mould. If I add a jamb extension to the hinge edge then the door will not be over the sill. My old door had an oak sill that extended beyond the jamb, now I know why. In retrospect I should have purchased a door with wider jambs, but I wasn't aware of the problem at the time.
    Hanging the door in a plane with the leaning wall would cause the door to strike the floor before fully opening.
    I would appreciate any suggestions you may have. Right now chiseling seems my best prospect. (Mike Holmes would have a fit).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Northern Virginia
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    Default Re: Plumb door/Leaning wall

    I don't understand why you don't cut a long, tapering extension jamb for the inside jambs and after attaching it put on the casing. You said something about the door not being over the sill? I don't get that.
    Position the bottom of the unit where it belongs; plumb it; add/shave (jambs!) where needed; trim it. Add to the upper/inside, shave the upper/outside.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    nova scotia, canada
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    Default Re: Plumb door/Leaning wall

    i think what their saying casey is that the exterior wall isnt plumb. they want the brick mould and nailing flange hard to the wall so to get a seal but when they do this the door wont operate correctly..

    i wouldnt remove any of the framing to create plumb. what you could do is make custom pieces of wood that go around the opening which will make the door go in the opening plumb. for the sil you just need to install a peice of pressure treate or azec under it so its supported and doesnt bend or break off. i do this on every door i do.. many production guys dont do it and wonder why the doors they install have problems down the road. a friend of mine is a window and door service tech and this sort of thing is a bread and butter fix for him.

    from there when your ready for interior trim your jamb extensions will have some funky tapered rips going on but its gotta be done
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    6,500

    Default Re: Plumb door/Leaning wall

    I'm with jkirk on this one: never compromise the integrity of your framing. Filling in spots is a better idea than chiseling away your framing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    3

    Default Re: Plumb door/Leaning wall

    Thanks for your responses. If I add a tapered strip to the inside jambs I have to move at least the two upper hinges. Doing that is the same as installing the door in a plane with the leaning wall, and the bottom of the door will hit the floor when it's opened.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    nova scotia, canada
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    Default Re: Plumb door/Leaning wall

    no no... make tapered 2x4's for the outside of the wall so the wall will sit plumb... and operate properly... but by doing so you might also need to make tapered jamb extensions for the inside so the casing will work
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
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    Default Re: Plumb door/Leaning wall

    Quote Originally Posted by baronernst View Post
    Thanks for your responses. If I add a tapered strip to the inside jambs I have to move at least the two upper hinges. Doing that is the same as installing the door in a plane with the leaning wall, and the bottom of the door will hit the floor when it's opened.
    If the issue is that the door will not open 180*, the thing to do is use a broader hinge. A 3.5x4.5 hinge will give 1" more clearance for "trim" than a square 3.5x3.5 hinge. That's what they made them for.
    Let me clarify, _I_ never said to cut studs. If you're at the framing stage (no drywall, no exterior sheathing) you can shim the studs. I'm just surmising that the OP is beyond the framing stage and therefore must look to a trim solution not a framing-based one.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Plumb door/Leaning wall

    Thanks for your response. The door is in a narrow hallway with about 8" of wall on either side. The door only opens about 100*, but would hit the floor if not plumb. The original door had a wider sill that protruded beyond the jambs, it was also 2" thick (oak). When I removed the door I had to rebuild the outside band, and joists to the level of the subfloor to accomodate the new pre-hung jamb with aluminum sill. Like I said in my original post I could have prevented this problem by ordering a wider jamb and adding tapered shims to the inside of the wall studs and jacks. The wall would have approached a 2x6 wall, but since the hallway is narrow it would not have been noticeable, and the wall would have been plumb.
    I'm afraid my only solution is to get a new, wider jamb, or split the one I have, add a spacer under the door stop, and add a wider saddle insert to the (also split) aluminum sill.
    The house has been rebricked w/ new windows and doors so only the inside of the wall, around the door, is accessible. If it was a 2x6 wall I would just chisel away the discrepancy, but I am very reluctant to do it on a 2x4 wall.

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