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  1. #1
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    Default Walls for steam shower/tub?

    Do I need to tile the ceiling if I install a glass enclosed steam shower /tub? What if I use green board? Is it enough?

    Is green board drywall still necessary if it's going to be tiled over anyway?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Walls for steam shower/tub?

    You can't use green board in shower ceiling, because of weight issues. I wouldn't use tiles either.

    Green board is still the way to go with bathroom walls.

    There are a few threads about this subject, research and refer to them.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Walls for steam shower/tub?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluefairy View Post
    Do I need to tile the ceiling if I install a glass enclosed steam shower /tub? What if I use green board? Is it enough?

    Is green board drywall still necessary if it's going to be tiled over anyway?
    If the glass is going up to the ceiling then no green board would be allowed .

    The gypsum association says .....


    Water resistant gypsum backing board ( green board ) shall NOT be used in
    critical areas of high humidity such as around hot tubs,steam rooms, indoor swimming pools, saunas

    Also , it's likely your local building code would not allow the green board within this steam shower enclosure.

    Sounds like the best bet would be to use cement backer board throughout the shower , covered with a water proofing membrane like Kerdi ( or use Kerdi board ) then tile ( even the ceiling ) if you wish.
    Last edited by canuk; 09-19-2011 at 10:54 PM.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Walls for steam shower/tub?

    I never heard of cement backer board. I hope the contractor knows how to install. If the ceiling gets this cement backer board are you saying I dont have to tile? then why bother tiling the walls either?
    Last edited by Bluefairy; 09-20-2011 at 03:01 AM. Reason: I reread the answeres

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Walls for steam shower/tub?

    Blue,

    Steam showers are not like building a regular shower. There are a number of specific additional steps to take. You'll do much better if you head on over to the John Bridge Tile Forum and ask your questions there. Research their "whirrled famus liberry" as well. Look for Wendy's steam shower project.

    According to the TCNA 'greenboard' is no longer acceptable for use behind tile around showers, tubs and the like. For steam showers you'll need CBU (cement board) or Kerdi-board properly installed. DId your contractor mention insulation?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Walls for steam shower/tub?

    I just saw a video of Kerdi-board installation an it looks too thick. are you saying I need to install both cement backer board with that thick kerdi board?

    I cant seem to link the video.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Walls for steam shower/tub?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluefairy View Post
    I never heard of cement backer board. I hope the contractor knows how to install. If the ceiling gets this cement backer board are you saying I dont have to tile? then why bother tiling the walls either?
    Cement backer board is a very common material used as a substrate in showers and if you have an experienced contractor they should be familiar with how to install and water proof it properly.

    As stated earlier --- green board is not recommended by the gypsum board association to be used at all ( critical areas of high humidity ) for walls or ceiling in your situation --- and it's likely your local municipal building authority would not allow the green board to be used as a substrate within the steam shower enclosure --- period.

    Reason being green board is only water ( moisture ) resistant and NOT waterproof . The paper face and back will mold along with the gypsum core will eventually disintegrate when it becomes wet.

    However, since green board is water ( moisture ) resistant it is the only type of drywall recommended and , in many jurisdictions , allowed to be used in the rest of the bathroom ( outside the shower ).

    In some jurisdictions moisture resistant drywall can be used for the ceiling and part of the wall in a traditional tub/shower or stand alone shower since this is not considered critical areas of high humidity .
    In other words , with a standard tub/shower the first 5 feet from the lip of the tub up toward the ceiling cannot be any type of drywall --- but --- the remainder to and including the ceiling can be moisture resistant drywall. For a stand alone shower it would be 6 feet from the floor up toward the ceiling with the remainder including the ceiling being moisture resistant drywall.

    Cement backer board is a common substrate used in showers , though it is not water proof , it does not have mold issues when it becomes wet. The fact this substrate is not water proof is why a waterproof membrane , like the mentioned Kerdi , is used --- especially in your situation of critical areas of high humidity .

    The Kerdi board mentioned earlier is a relatively new waterproof substrate product and is a great product.

    As for using tile --- that's your choice and you had originally brought it up.

    You definitely want some sort of non porous and durable finish surface within the steam shower. Personally , if tiles were the finish of choice I would use porcelain tiles. However, you have to consider all those multiple grout joints which , in them selves, are not waterproof. They are a weak spot for moisture and will need to be sealed on a regular basis. Which is another reason a waterproofing membrane is applied to the substrate before tiles are applied.

    If it were me --- I wouldn't use tiles at all but rather consider a man made product like solid surface or quartz that's commonly used for counter tops. The seams between each sheet are epoxied together forming a seamless ( for the most part ) surface.

    Like HoustonRemodeler said --- Steam showers are not like building a regular shower.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Walls for steam shower/tub?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluefairy View Post
    I just saw a video of Kerdi-board installation an it looks too thick. are you saying I need to install both cement backer board with that thick kerdi board?

    I cant seem to link the video.
    No --- one or the other.
    There is a seperate product called Kerdi which is applied to the cement backer board.

    The Kerdi board is a seperate product that is a foam backer board with the Kerdi material apllied to it.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Walls for steam shower/tub?

    Kerdi board comes in a variety of thicknesses, from 1/4" up to 2 inches. For steam showers you'll want to use nothing thinner than the 1/2" over standard 16"OC studs. The 1/2" kerdi board has a perm rating of .46 The lower the rating, the better for steam shower applications. For steam showers you want a perm rating no higher than 1.0 at 130F. The 1/2" kerdi board will handle the walls and ceiling of your steamer very well. Use the schluter foam base or make your own mud bed and use the Kerdi drain for a complete waterproof system.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Walls for steam shower/tub?

    Quote Originally Posted by canuk View Post
    As for using tile --- that's your choice and you had originally brought it up.

    You definitely want some sort of non porous and durable finish surface within the steam shower. Personally , if tiles were the finish of choice I would use porcelain tiles. However, you have to consider all those multiple grout joints which , in them selves, are not waterproof. They are a weak spot for moisture and will need to be sealed on a regular basis. Which is another reason a waterproofing membrane is applied to the substrate before tiles are applied. [/I]
    Are you saying I actually dont need to tile the ceiling? that would be ideal.
    Thanx

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