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  1. #11
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    jkirk, you're right about those "how to" vids. Some of them are simply dangerous, and should not be allowed on YT.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    Ladder stabilizer

    $25

    Help us name our new Hidden Content

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    Lloyd, it's better to have a working platform ...

    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    Those pictures are obviously not in the U.S.

    It must be somewhere that people are allowed to take risks, and stupidity gets laughed out of the courtroom.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    These pictures are from Asia. Could be China, Taiwan, Korea, who knows. See the A/C units?

    Safety? Osha? Workmen's comp? 8 hour days? they've never heard of these.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    I don't agree with everything in that video either. I can't imagine putting a nail in my roof like that. Thankfully, my roof's pitch is roughly on the order of 15 degrees or less, so I don't think that step installation is necessary. Otherwise, my roof and gutter look just like what he shows in the video.

    What gets me is that the guy in that video makes stepping on and off the roof so easy! Is the "secret" to extend the ladder above the roof line by an amount more or less equal to his height so he has something to hold onto?

    Also... as an aside... I don't see a need to put nails in my roof like this guy in the video did, but I did see a recent episode of Ask This Old House where they put some solar collectors on the roof. I am not sure what they are called, but the roof had what appeared to be a 45 degree pitch, so they attached some horizontal boards for use as steps and bracing. How did they do that without putting holes in that roof?

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    While I'm a proponent of ladder safety, I don't agree with the guy in that video. Tying off to the gutter is a bad idea! Gutter spikes are more stable than gutter ties, but the average DIY'r isn't going to know that. The difference is that a spike goes through the gutter and into the fascia or rafter tail behind, so it should be fairly stable, a gutter tie just interlocks into the folded lip of the gutter, again, with the prevalence of aluminum gutters, I would NOT trust my safety to one.

    The thing is, you don't know the integrity of that gutter spike or tie, the last thing you want to happen is have the ladder shift and either lose your tie off point or damage the gutter, let alone fall.

    Secondly, you NEVER want to nail a 2x into the surface of the roof, you're only going to cause an entry point for water, no matter how many nails you put back into the hole you created and how much caulk you smear over the top of it. If you MUST spike a 2x into the surface like that, then the proper fix would be to lift the damaged shingle and put tar into the nail hole, then press the top shingle back down until the tar squirts out of the surface hole a little bit. I guarantee that this repair won't leak - ever - and will lay you very good odds that the other guys method will, only you won't know it until you see the roof sheathing full of rot damage. Also, if you do this every time you get on the roof in the same spot, you're going to destroy the water proof ability of the roof no matter how well it's resealed when the spikes are pulled. Other issues with driving nails like that is that unless the roof sheathing is substantial, there's very little grabbing power there, and, wherever nails poke through the other side you'll have holes or blow-out.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    I didn't see the TOH video, it's possible they were using what's called roof jacks. You lift the shingle and nail the jack under it. This keeps the holes out of the elements so that they can't leak.

    AS for stepping off the ladder, when you're completely comfortable with ladders and making that transition, it's no big deal and it looks easy. When you're afraid of the transition, you're very stiff and full of trepidation, so your movements are deliberate and awkward. Having the top of the ladder 3 feet above the roofline certainly helps the transition, however too much ladder gets in the way of your body leaning over the top of it as you're making your transitions, making it all the more difficult to do.

    Another thing I worry about with too much ladder above the roofline is the urge to grab and pull on it while you are making the downward transition, which can unseat the footing and cause the ladder to kick out of move while you're making your move.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    Here's a way you can simulate transitioning to and from the roof without leaving the ground.

    Set a kitchen chair in the middle of the room. Place some masking tape on the floor: one piece about 6" behind the chair yet parallel to the back (and as long as the space between the legs); and two more pieces from the back legs straight out each side.

    The masking behind the chair represents a ladder rung. The tape going out each side represents the edge of the roof.

    Standing behind the chair on the "rung", hold onto the back of the chair and carefully step around the chair onto the "roof" (and back) without stepping on or behind the tape representing the roof line. Use the chair for stability, but practice doing this until you can confidently do the motion without moving the chair.

    Once you've mastered this, place the chair so the back legs are on the edge of a raised platform (say, 4-6" high). A porch or deck might suffice, or maybe the curb at the edge of the street. Place masking tape or a chalk line behind the chair, just like before. The difference this time is that you'll be stepping off of the "rung" onto the "roof" (the raised platform) at a different height. Practice this a while.

    Remember, when you are on the "rung" your toes need to point toward the "roof.

    This way, you can practice the movement in a safe environment without fear of falling a long distance. It might help you build skill and confidence.

    Here's a bonus: you might find that the ladder is actually a bit easier since the ladder will be leaning away from you (giving you more space) whereas the chair back typically leans toward you (encroaching your space).

    Just remember: you have to do this without moving the chair (in practice) or the ladder (in real life).
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Ladder Safety -- Roof Access

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post

    Maybe it should read: UNSAFETY LADDER, USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

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