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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,418

    Default Re: circuit breakers keep tripping

    Good point, Jack. The thought was in the back of my mind but never poked its way forward.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Semi-Retired Electric View Post
    Looks like if both oven elements and two surface elements were turned on together (38.8A) a 40A breaker would be running real close to the trip point, even considering the fact that breakers are "inverse time lag devices" and can stand an overload for a short period of time.
    Unlikely that both oven elements would be on at the same time. Most ovens are one or the other. Some ovens will turn them both on during a preheat cycle, but I haven't seen too many like that.

    I agree, If the breaker is tripping with only a couple of burners on, either it's a weak breaker or a bad element or switch.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    jersey
    Posts
    174

    Default Re: circuit breakers keep tripping

    Quote Originally Posted by The Semi-Retired Electric View Post



    Even with the correct breaker/wire/range combination if the electrician didn't use no-lox or torque the connections the heat from the bad connection could cause the breaker to trip.
    WHAT? No-lox is not required (unless your in Canada) and will not make any difference on the installation.
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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Columbiana, Alabama
    Posts
    644

    Default Re: circuit breakers keep tripping

    Lloyd, you're right it's not required unless the wire is Aluminum AA 13000 series alloy, some types of USE, some overhead conductors or the connector shipped pre-filled with oxide inhibitor.

    I've seen bare AL crumble in wet/damp enviroments when it wasn't used.

    However, for decades now, I have rarely complied with the Code, I usually exceeded it and would not dream of terminating AL without using no-lox (or equal). But, that's just my opinion.



    Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
    Maurice Turgeon, http://thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

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