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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    4

    Default Protecting electric baseboard heaters in workshop

    I am "reconverting" a garage (now a mancave) into a workshop (15' x 10', with a 9 x 9 entrance (like an L shape))- LUCKY ME.

    I am putting tongue and grove plywood over the old carpet. There is electric baseboard heat on three walls now.

    How do I protect those baseboard heaters from dust? I'd like to use them if possible (outside of Philly), but do have a spaceheater I could use to make it warm enough to work, if needed.

    You thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    116

    Default Re: Protecting electric baseboard heaters in workshop

    I think that protecting them from dust is problematic. Most ideas would probably involve covering them. However, they are working the movement of heated air upwards, which draws cooler air across the elements. Any covering disrupts this process.

    I would just be sure I had a good sized nozzle on my SHOP-VAC and periodically gave them a good vacuuming, both from the bottom and through the top/front area.

    Cheers.
    John.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Columbiana, Alabama
    Posts
    623

    Default Re: Protecting electric baseboard heaters in workshop

    I don't believe the surface temperature of most baseboard heaters is hot enough to ignite wood or dust but have you considered the oil filled electric radiators?

    Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
    Maurice Turgeon, http://thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Protecting electric baseboard heaters in workshop

    OK, so maybe no cover and just a lot of vacuuming. Guess that is what shop vacs are made of. As long as there is no danger of ignition.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,089

    Default Re: Protecting electric baseboard heaters in workshop

    How about placing an air filter nearby to trap the dust?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Protecting electric baseboard heaters in workshop

    No matter how good your dust collection system is, you're still going to get significant amounts of dust settling on every surface within the shop.

    I would recommend shielding your baseboards against damage by moving equipment and materials, but not worry about dust getting to them. Opt for regular cleaning with a vacuum or air hose to blow the dust and debris out of the cases.

    You'll be able to set your cleaning schedule by how much dust is created in the shop. Invest in a dust collector and use it with anything that creates dust, such as bandsaws, table saws, sanders, and such. Large chip items such as planers and joiners don't make much dust unless you're cutting MDF material with them. Build yourself a down-draft table for all sanding, this will draw the bulk of dust into the table and filtration system rather than let it go airborne to settle out on everything.

    Also invest in an air filter for the shop. You can buy or build one, which ever suits your needs best. To build one, all you need to do is build a box to house a standard pleated furnace filter and a high volume fan.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Columbiana, Alabama
    Posts
    623

    Default Re: Protecting electric baseboard heaters in workshop

    Good advice A.Spruce, especially the air cleaner! Good 1st project.

    Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
    Maurice Turgeon, http://thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Protecting electric baseboard heaters in workshop

    Thanks again - already have a dust collector and air cleaner.

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