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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Default liquid sandpaper

    can i use liquid sandpaper on marlight paneling? i would like to paint over it for a cheap fix and i'm not sure how to go about it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    7,018

    Default Re: liquid sandpaper

    Where is this Marlite, and is it actually Marlite (a formica like product ) or is it masonite (compressed fiberboard similar to older clipboards ) with a vinyl surface?
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    1,769

    Default Re: liquid sandpaper

    Personally, I would prime the surface. I have tested every primer I sell on Formica surfaces and by far the best for adhesion is BIN sealer, a white pigmented shellac based sealer/primer. It leaves a very thin build-up and is almost impossible to scratch off with the fingernail.

    Unfortunately, shellac flake is a commodity and the cost of shellac has gone up over $40 per gallon in the last few months.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    4

    Default Re: liquid sandpaper

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    Where is this Marlite, and is it actually Marlite (a formica like product ) or is it masonite (compressed fiberboard similar to older clipboards ) with a vinyl surface?
    It is in the kitchen. I'm not really sure it has a shiny surface that has a million tiny cracks on it. What I can see of it looks like some kind pressed board.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    7,018

    Default Re: liquid sandpaper

    If the cracks are also swollen, then it's masonite with a vinyl surface. This product is not worth trying to paint or restore, it needs to come out.

    If the cracks are flat, then it could be marlite, in which case you could fill the cracks, sand smooth, prime with a good primer, and paint, but understand that painted marlite will look only slightly better than it's current condition. Again, the best course of action is to remove it.

    My preference for walls is drywall with a textured finish and painted a neutral color. If the marlite is a backsplash then I'd replace it with tile or a solid surface. The nice thing about applying materials such as tile or solid surface is that it will cover the glue and damage done to the wall during removal of the marlite.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: liquid sandpaper

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    If the cracks are also swollen, then it's masonite with a vinyl surface. This product is not worth trying to paint or restore, it needs to come out.

    If the cracks are flat, then it could be marlite, in which case you could fill the cracks, sand smooth, prime with a good primer, and paint, but understand that painted marlite will look only slightly better than it's current condition. Again, the best course of action is to remove it.

    My preference for walls is drywall with a textured finish and painted a neutral color. If the marlite is a backsplash then I'd replace it with tile or a solid surface. The nice thing about applying materials such as tile or solid surface is that it will cover the glue and damage done to the wall during removal of the marlite.
    Thanks for your help it looks like my hubby will have a little more work to do. He was trying to avoid removal but it may be easier for him. Again Thank You

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,018

    Default Re: liquid sandpaper

    You're welcome.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

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