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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    1

    Default Garden Shed Sheathing & Bottom Plate Contact Soil / Sod

    I'm preparring to build a garden shed on an old existing slab once used for basketball. If I use pressure treated 2x4 for the bottom plate, do I need to worry about rot? The grade of the yard will cover the bottom plate and up to 2 inches of sheathing.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
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    5,081

    Default Re: Garden Shed Sheathing & Bottom Plate Contact Soil / Sod

    Pressure treated is not a life long deal, so keep the wood off the soil as much as you can. Sitting on a slab, it's probably good for 20 years, give or take a few.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,583

    Default Re: Garden Shed Sheathing & Bottom Plate Contact Soil / Sod

    There are multiple grades of pressure treated wood. Get the highest rated version. If you can keep the earth from actual contact with the wood, you will gain longevity. Also, consider placing the self-stick butyl banding to the bottom of the boards so that they are not in direct contact with the concrete. This is the stuff that is often put over deck joists before the decking goes down. The closed cell foam seal, which is used under walls when they are set, would also keep the wood isolated from the concrete.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,096

    Default Re: Garden Shed Sheathing & Bottom Plate Contact Soil / Sod

    Quote Originally Posted by kkehler View Post
    I'm preparring to build a garden shed on an old existing slab once used for basketball. If I use pressure treated 2x4 for the bottom plate, do I need to worry about rot? The grade of the yard will cover the bottom plate and up to 2 inches of sheathing.
    From what I read, it seems you intend to cover part of the wood with dirt- and that is not a good idea even with treated lumber. Either raise the slab or re-landscape to keep the dirt and water away and it will last much, much longer. Adding height to the slab with more concrete will likely be the easiest good solution here. Otherwise your non-treated wood components will rot and the floor will become awash in a heavy rain. Whatever you do, keep dirt and water away from wood (even treated)and it will be happier and last longer.

    Phil

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