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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    1

    Default Damage to water pipes if left dry

    I know for a fact that the house I am buying has had water line damage. For the past two years the pipes inside the house have been dry. Could they be damaged from being dry so long? Should they be replaced?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
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    1,183

    Default Re: Damage to water pipes if left dry

    What type of pipe is it? If it's copper it should be fine, but if it's galvanized you could have a problem. With galvanized when you turn the water on the rust in line will move. It could end up plugging the line or your faucets.

    John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,620

    Default Re: Damage to water pipes if left dry

    You don't say where this is located. If you mean that the water was off and you are in an area that freezes, you may have a problem if the pipes were not properly drained.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    208

    Default Re: Damage to water pipes if left dry

    Johnjh2o:

    If the water supply pipes are galvanized, could clogging of the faucets be avoided by taking off all the aerators on all the faucets and then fully opening each faucet in turn until the water runs clean on each side of each faucet?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    South*East
    Posts
    1,183

    Default Re: Damage to water pipes if left dry

    Quote Originally Posted by Nestor View Post
    Johnjh2o:

    If the water supply pipes are galvanized, could clogging of the faucets be avoided by taking off all the aerators on all the faucets and then fully opening each faucet in turn until the water runs clean on each side of each faucet?
    I would start by opening the outside faucets first then go to the bath tub turning on the cold only. (turn the supply off to the water heater) Then remove the aerators and move onto each faucet. Turn the water on to the heater with the drain to the heater open. When the water clears up coming from the heater drain turn the drain off and allow the heater to fill. Go to the tub first and open the hot to remove the air,and continue to run until the water clears. Then go on to the rest of the faucets. As I'm sure you know the tub is piped full size with no aerators so there is less of a chance of plugging it up. When I was working in the northeast there were many homes that we drained for the winter and this is procedure we used when turning them back on.

    John
    Last edited by johnjh2o; 07-30-2011 at 07:29 AM.

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