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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    Default black foam type pipe insulation

    Can the black foam type pipe insulation from the home depot be used on 3/4" copper pipe on a hot water baseboard system. Will it handle the heat without melting. I can't seem to find any specs on it. The stuff I am talking about comes in 6' lengths and has a slit to slide over the pipe.

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    208

    Default Re: black foam type pipe insulation

    I expect it would probably be OK for that application, but I would suggest a better product would be something called "All Service Jacket" or "ASJ" for short. If you phone around to the heating contractors in your area and ask who sells pipe insulation, you should be able to find ASJ locally.



    It's called All Service Jacket because it's used for everything from steam heating to refrigeration. The insulation is a fiberglass insulation that's bonded together with a glue of some sort making the insulation quite sturdy. It's got a seam in it, just like the stuff you're talking about, and it also has a reflective coating on the ID of the outside paper jacket to reflect radiant heat back inward. It comes in various insulation radii, from 1 inch up. It's not very expensive, but I'm sure it'd cost more than the foam stuff.

    With a pipe shooter:



    fitted into a cordless drill, a tape measure, a hand saw and a miter box, you can fit ASJ around just about any kind of piping.

    ASJ would be a much better quality product to use here, but it's always a hassle working with fiberglass. Wear long sleeve shirts and just have a bath or shower after every evening working with it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,751

    Default Re: black foam type pipe insulation

    The pipe insulation you refer to is supposed to go on hot pipes with no problems. It's inexpensive and easy to apply, seems like a "no risk" investment.

    I can't see why you couldn't use it for your 3/4" copper pipe.

    In general, it's hard to measure energy savings due to pipe insulation, at least here in Southern california, where temps rarely dip below 40F. IMO, the saving reports are based on estimates.
    Last edited by dj1; 07-22-2011 at 08:07 AM.

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