+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1

    Default Garden hose fittings

    Hello,
    I have a really nice 100 foot long garden hose, very sturdy, no cracks or breaks. But, one of the end fittings needs to be replaced ( the female end).
    Problem is, this hose has internal "flow ribs" that interfere with the installation of a "normal" new female end fitting (brass from my buds at ACE).
    Is there a special fitting for this type of hose ? How do I get a new female fitting installed and sealed ?

    Thank You
    Ms Ashley H.
    Cornelius, Oregon

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    208

    Default Re: Garden hose fittings

    Ashley:

    You should be aware that rubber (and synthetic rubber compounds) flow under heat and pressure.

    So, all you have to do is jam a normal female hose fitting into the end of your hose and tighten some hose clamps on the connection and the pressure applied by the hose clamps will cause the rubber hose to conform to the shape it's pressed against.

    Heat accelerates this process, so if you can put the hose end in a warm place, that would help (but even without any additional applied heat, the rubber will flow to conform to the shape it's pressed around). It might take a few weeks for the rubber to seal around the new fitting, but it'll happen. Just keep the hose clamps tight and the hose end in as warm a place as is practical for you.

    When I worked in the oil business, it was common to set and remove rubber "packers" at the bottoms of oil and gas wells to isolate the rock strata that was producing oil or gas (so as to minimize water production). The pressure of the setting mechanism inside the rubber packer combined with the geothermal heat 3000 feet under the ground would cause the rubber to flow into every little undulation on the inside diameter of the steel casing pipe so that you could see tiny ridges in the rubber that corresponded to scratches on the inside of the casing pipe that were caused by running tools into and out of the well. Those ridges weren't there when the packer was first run into the well.
    Last edited by Nestor; 07-16-2011 at 03:27 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •