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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    74

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    So do I want to get this as tight as I can?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    So do I want to get this as tight as I can?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    208

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    No, absolutely not.

    You want to tighten that compression nut until it's fairly tight, so that it doesn't leak, but no further. Theoretically, as long as the contact pressure between the plastic ferrule and the plastic tubing, and between the plastic ferrule and the tapered hole on the compression stop are both greater than the water pressure in your town, then the joint shouldn't leak. That means you don't have to tighten the bygeezus out of it; you just have to ensure that the compression nut it tight enough to create more pressure on both sides of the plastic ferrule than your water pressure is.

    There was no more tube in the fitting, so it didn't break, however it can only go in 3/8 inch; that's as much room as there is. There's a ledge that prevents it going any further. And the tubing doesn't interfere with the spindle turning.
    Bingo! Tha's what happened. You cut the tubing to the correct length BEFORE you tightened up the compression nut ABOVE on the faucet. You put the cut end of the tubing inside the valve, and as you tightened up the compression nut on the faucet, the tubing was drawn upward into the tapered hole on the faucet inlet. So, the tubing moved upward a good 1/4 to 5/16 inch when you were tightening the compression nut on the faucet.

    Then, you tightened the compression nut on the valve, and by that time there was only 1/8 to 1/16 of an inch of tubing (if that) inside the valve.

    Always, always, always tighten up the compression nut on the faucet before marking the tube for cutting at the valve end. After tightening the faucet end, mark it at the bottom of the threaded section on the valve outlet. Then, bend the tube and put it inside the valve with the plastic ferrule and metal compression nut already on the tubing. If you'd have done that, then there wouldn'ta been a problem.

    The smoking gun is the fact that there was NO tubing left in the valve body. The only way that could happen is if the tubing was cut too short. I believe you cut the tubing to what you considered the correct length, but you failed to account for the fact that the head at the top of the tubing crawls into the brass faucet inlets some distance when that connection is tightened. In this case, it probably crawled up a good 3/8 of an inch, leaving the bottom of the tubing barely inside the valve when you tightened the compression nut on the valve.

    "Experience" happens when you learn from your mistakes. From now on, tighten the plastic supply tube at the faucet end before marking it at the valve end. Mark and cut the tubing at the bottom of the threaded section of the valve. Then, bend the tubing so that it fits into the valve, and tighten at the valve end. That way, you don't end up inadvertantly cutting the tubing too shore, which is exactly what happened here.
    Last edited by Nestor; 07-04-2011 at 12:48 AM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,066

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    Consider yourself extremely lucky, that the leak happened while you were in the kitchen. Ohterwise, you could have had damages in the trillions.

    Why do you want to re-do this supply line with the same type of tubing after this incident? Why not replace it with some other type of supply line?

    This PEX tube is very cheap, I've used it before and I've used the chrome type as well, but I prefer other choices. There is a saying: "The cheap ends up costing more". Remember that when you do projects around the house.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    I used this type of tubing because other people say it's better than the braided stainless steel ones. Quoting johnjh20: "As far as I'm concerned that is the best supply on the market." I'm not going for cheap, I'm going for better. But if I can't get a reasonable answer about why the tubing popped out, I'll definitely go back to the braided SS.

    And no, Nestor, when I said there was no tubing left in the fitting, I thought the question was whether or not the tubing broke. The tubing is plenty long enough; even now, with it still connected to the faucet, I can bottom it out in the compression fitting. But it only goes 3/8" into the fitting; that's as deep as the fitting is.

    You want to tighten that compression nut until it's fairly tight, so that it doesn't leak, but no further.
    That's what I did. I did like for the braided SS lines: finger tight, then a 1/4 turn with a wrench.
    Last edited by johnL; 07-04-2011 at 12:53 AM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    Well, look what I just found on the tubing label: "Hand tighten then additional 2 turns." Crap! It's not all that easy to see, there's some printing stamped over other printing. Man!
    Okay, well, that's the problem.
    Thanks for the responses, everybody.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
    Posts
    1,168

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    Quote Originally Posted by johnL View Post
    Well, look what I just found on the tubing label: "Hand tighten then additional 2 turns." Crap! It's not all that easy to see, there's some printing stamped over other printing. Man!
    Okay, well, that's the problem.
    Thanks for the responses, everybody.
    There you go johnL. It has to be tight enough to compress the ferrule. Like the supply you said you took apart. When I had a large crew and was doing new work we were using up to 100 PEX supplies a month.

    John

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    Well, there's another problem: The nut won't tighten 2 whole turns! I get it about 1 1/2, and that's as far as it will go. Now I'm stripping the edges off the nut trying to get it to 2 whole turns!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,066

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    First of all, it doesn't have to be exactly 2 turns, or 720 degrees...

    A turn and a half would probably do. It's all in the plumber's touch and feel.

    But what worries me, is the fact that you are struggling with something that should give you no problems at all.

    Listen to me, replace this tube, and have a peaceful 4th of July.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    208

    Default Re: pex supply blew apart

    JohnL:

    I'd go back to the braided stainless steel supply hoses. In my 20+ years of experience, I've never seen what's happened to you.

    I NEVER tighten those compression nuts by hand; I always use a wrench to tighten them, and I always tighten them fairly tight.

    I'm thinking that for the extra $3 or $4 that the braided stainless supply tubes are gonna cost, it's gonna give you peace of mind. The next time someone flushes a toilet in your house and you hear water running full blast through some piping, you're gonna be up with a flashlight checking all your supply tubes for fear that another one let go.

    Just for the peace of mind, I'd suggest you go back to what you trust.

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