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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    2

    Default can I replace my own gas oven?

    Hello,

    We need to replace our free standing gas oven, and don't want to pay and arm and a leg to hire a plumber. Does anyone have any tips?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
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    Default Re: can I replace my own gas oven?

    A freestanding gas oven is not very difficult to replace. But there are very important things to watch for.

    First of all, you are dealing with gas, and I don't recommend to those who have no experience to do any gas work. The last thing you need is a gas leak.

    Some later models are attached to the wall with a safety bracket. To bring the oven out in such a case you'll need to free it from the bracket.

    You'll notice that the gas supply line is very long, allowing you access behind the oven, to shut the gas valve and detach the supply line from the old oven.

    If you are not comfortable, let the store install it for you. Most stores offer installation with the delivery.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    208

    Default Re: can I replace my own gas oven?

    My understanding is that in some parts of the USA, people are allowed to replace their own gas fired water heaters. If that's the case, I don't see much difference between replacing a water heater and a gas stove. But, where I live, you need a "gas ticket" (meaning you're licenced to work with gas piping) to install or replace any kind of gas appliance. Any job which requires that a person open a gas line requires that the person have a gas ticket.

    However, a gas leak can be extremely dangerous. Best to find out IF you're allowed to do this kind of work yourself where you live. If so, then post again and we can provide more specific directions.

    If not, then you need to consider that you can save 90% of the cost of maintaining your home by doing all the stuff that's both easy and safe yourself. It's foolish to start trying to shave that remaining 10% down any further by doing stuff that's dangerous and which you're not qualified to do.
    Last edited by Nestor; 07-03-2011 at 10:49 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    2

    Default Re: can I replace my own gas oven?

    Hello,

    I'm told that I can replace the oven without a plumber. The issue here is money. It's going to cost almost $250 for the story to install it! A plumber would be even more. The oven we're looking at is less than $300! I'm also told that it's fairly easy to replace an oven so long as you are very careful to make sure everything is sealed properly. Safety is always number one, but if we can do this and safe a boatload of money, I'd really like to. I appreciate any advice you can provide.

    thanks so much!
    K

    PS our existing oven isn't connected to the wall - just the gas line.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
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    5,081

    Default Re: can I replace my own gas oven?

    I don't know where you live, but $250 to connect a new freestanding stove to the wall gas supply plus install a safety bracket is way out of line.

    And you claim the a plumber will be even more...These amounts exceed "Beverly Hills" prices.

    If you are determined to do it yourself, pay attention to the recommendations you are given here in this forum. Plus:

    - Turn the gas off at the valve. If it's hard to turn with a wrench, don't force it, replace the valve (less than $10). To replace the valve turn main gas valve off. Use yellow teflon tape, not white, or joint compound/sealant for the thread.
    - Visually inspect the gas supply line for kinks, cracks, bends. If slightly damaged, replace (less than $20). Do a gas leak check (mix some dishdetergent in a bowl and put some on the gas connections. If it bubbles - you have a leak).
    - All new ovens come with a safety bracket - to ensure that the oven won't tip over. Install it.

    Good luck.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
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    1,168

    Default Re: can I replace my own gas oven?

    It's your call if you fell you are qualified to install it then do so. But if your doing it with no qualifications and are just trying to save money how can you put a price on you and your families safety.

    John

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    208

    Default Re: can I replace my own gas oven?

    Maso:

    I'm not familiar with the "brackets" described in the previous posts, so I can't help you there.

    You need to shut off the gas to your stove, or whole house first. Follow the gas line back from the stove and see where there's a valve to shut the gas off. You need to shut the gas off before you disconnect the gas supply line to the old stove.

    Where I live, gas valves will typically be plug valves. Whether it's a plug valve or a ball valve or any other kind of valve in your gas line, there will typically be markings of some sort on the valve that turns with the plug or ball. When those markings are parallel to the gas valve body, then the valve is open. When they're perpendicular to the gas valve body, the valve is closed. If you only see a handle on the valve, then the handle itself is the marking, and when it's parallel to the valve body, the valve is open. Like this:



    Often, the marking will only be a pair of dimples on the plug of the valve. Watch to see that these markings move 90 degrees when you close the gas valve.

    There will be a gas connector that supplies gas to the old stove. This gas connector has a normal thread on it, so you unscrew it by turning counter clockwise just like you unscrew a light bulb. It's best to hold whatever the connector is screwed into steady with a second wrench or pair of plier while you undo the connector.

    Also, there should be an electrical cord to the gas stove to supply 120 volt power to it. You obviously need to unplug the old stove.

    Plug in the new stove. Screw in the gas connector to the new stove, and reinstall that bracket business others were talking about.

    NOW, turn the gas valve back on and check for gas leaks as follows:

    Mix up a 50:50 solution of liquid dish washing detergent and water and paint that all around every gas connection that you undid and reconnected using a small paint brush. Look for bubbles being blown at each connection point. Any time you brush a soapy solution, there will be tiny bubbles formed, but those aren't the ones you're looking for. You're looking for bubbles that GROW. Any place you see bubbles growing in size is a gas leak and needs to be corrected. While you're at it, check all the gas connections behind the new stove just to confirm that nothing is leaking.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by Nestor; 07-04-2011 at 04:38 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
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    1,522

    Default Re: can I replace my own gas oven?

    in canada as of 3 years ago plumbing and pipefitting are two eniterely different trades. yes both are similar but require different types of pipe. both are compulsary trades which means you absolutely must have your ticket to work in this trade. you screw something up big time you lose your license.

    do yourself a favor, dont cheap out and risk an explosion. if something does happen theres a good chance your home insurance company wont do anything for you if the explosion is tracked down the pipe work you did
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    12

    Default Re: can I replace my own gas oven?

    better if you get it done by a pro lest your risk blowing up the whole house

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: can I replace my own gas oven?

    How do you install a shutoff valve? I have a capped-off gas line on the first floor of my two-flat -- the former owners once had a stove there, but they moved to the top floor and had the stove uninstalled.

    It looks like it's as simple as shutting off the gas to the first floor, unscrewing the cap on the line, and screwing in the shutoff valve using thread sealer for gas lines. Is there anything I'm missing?

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