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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    208

    Default Re: connecting plastic and metal plumbing

    JohnL:

    I've seen those Fernco couplings used to replace chrome plated p-traps, and that's probably your best bet if you don't want to remove your cabinet.

    But, all of those old chrome plated p-traps were a problem waiting to happen from the day they were made. That's because the metal that was chrome plated was brass, which is an alloy of copper and zinc, and zinc is a highly reactive metal.

    If you've ever gone to change the rubber washer in an old water valve, you'll often find that the bibb screw is reddish brown in colour and crumbles under the force of your screw driver. That's because the head of the brass screw has been dezincified. The valve body itself is still strong because it's not made of brass, it's made of bronze, an alloy of copper and tin. Tin isn't nearly as reactive as zinc.

    In a chrome plated brass p-trap, it'll be the brass below the water line in the trap that dezincifies the fastest and the soonest. Hopefully there's still some strength left in that trap arm since it was above the water line for most of it's life. But I'd be gentle tightening up the clamp that squeezes the Fernco onto the chrome plated brass. You don't want to crush that tubing.

    And, if that doesn't work, then it's back to Plan A with removing the cabinet, opening up the wall and getting all of that chrome plated crap outta there.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: connecting plastic and metal plumbing

    Well, I don't know what I'm going to do, but I appreciate all the input.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: connecting plastic and metal plumbing

    Are those Fernco couplers to code ?

    I have one of those in my powder room in VA. In our prior house in No. CA, the plumber asked for a written waiver when he used one to connect a break in a PVC clothes washer vertical drain pipe - - I asked him to use one because the vertical pipe was long and wasn't tied down well and was subject to slight forces and it finally broke where it went into the foundation.

    The rubber coupler is versatile, but it doesn't look like it will last as long as VC or metal that is denser & resistant to chemicals.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,084

    Default Re: connecting plastic and metal plumbing

    Your photo is good, but not good enough.

    It would help us if we knew what's behind the escutheon. Try to remove it so we can see how the chrome waste arm is attached to the drain in the wall. There are various ways to connect it. Then we can help you find the best solution.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,096

    Default Re: connecting plastic and metal plumbing

    Chrome P-trap connections aren't tapered like PVC to use a slip ring washer, they have a flat flange made to use a flat rubber washer- readily available from any plumbing supply house. While you're at it print the pic and show them so they can get a good laugh at it while they sell you a real tailpiece extension with the rubber washer. "Flexi" pipes are never a good idea and should only be used when there is no other way of making the connection. BTW someone commented about Ferncos- around here the code inspectors love them as long as they are accessible. I've used plenty with never a problem.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: connecting plastic and metal plumbing

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Your photo is good, but not good enough.

    It would help us if we knew what's behind the escutheon. Try to remove it so we can see how the chrome waste arm is attached to the drain in the wall. There are various ways to connect it. Then we can help you find the best solution.
    Behind the escutcheon is just a ragged hole in the sheetrock. Not a big one, just an ugly ragged one.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: connecting plastic and metal plumbing

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastercarpentry View Post
    Chrome P-trap connections aren't tapered like PVC to use a slip ring washer, they have a flat flange made to use a flat rubber washer- readily available from any plumbing supply house.
    I'll take a look at that, thanks.
    While you're at it print the pic and show them so they can get a good laugh at it while they sell you a real tailpiece extension with the rubber washer. "Flexi" pipes are never a good idea and should only be used when there is no other way of making the connection.
    The guy who lived here before us loved them! They were in both bathrooms and the kitchen sink. I think, like somebody else said, they just look like hair catchers.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    62

    Default Re: connecting plastic and metal plumbing

    Use good quality sealant. We also had a similar problem in our bathrooms, we used the sealant, that closed the gap and the pipe works perfectly, although it is a temporary work, but it does the job very well and it lasts for a long period of time.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: connecting plastic and metal plumbing

    Just a note, avoid using teflon tape unless you are using it going metal to metal ( except for gas lines). Teflon tape is a thread lubricant and NOT meant for sealing. When going from metal to plastic, use a sealant such as pipe dope. Amateurs typically start tape right at the end of threads and then put multiple layers of teflon on threads. This is incorrect. Start the teflon tape a thread or two from the end, pull snuggly in the direction of "tightening" and separate by pulling tight until the tape breaks.

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