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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    74

    Default length of braided steel toilet hose

    I just replaced the supply hose on a toilet; the hose is a little longer than the distance from the toilet to the supply pipe, so there's a little bend in the hose. I bought the hose that was as close as I could get to the actual distance, but after putting it on I started to wonder: Is it better to use a hose that's just a little longer, and have a bend at both ends, or it is better to use a hose that's long enough to make a complete circle? That way, there's no bend stress at the connectors.

    Yes, I really do have better things to do than worry, but I just read a review from a guy who replaced his washing machine hoses with the braided-steel, guaranteed-never-to-leak-kind, and one of them exploded after about 3 months! Now I'm paranoid, because I was about to get some of those myself!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
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    5,557

    Default Re: length of braided steel toilet hose

    I personally don't use those braded hoses anymore. Every one I did try burst on me.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
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    1,168

    Default Re: length of braided steel toilet hose

    Any washer hose can fail at some point. The braided hose will give you longer service but they are not leak proof. They have a rubber lining with a steel braid over them.

    John

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    116

    Default Re: length of braided steel toilet hose

    Unless the hose is just a tad to long so there is a very slight bend (like one would make in a traditional metal pipe used in this connection), I get a much longer hose.

    My thought is that a complete circle with a large enough radius will not put too much strain on the connection end. It does not look the best, but I personally have never had one leak.

    .....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,081

    Default Re: length of braided steel toilet hose

    I replace water supply lines often, and I've used all kinds: stainless steel braded, plastic tubing, copper tubing, corrugated copper, etc. They are all about equal, and since I replace them often, I install which ever one I have in my stock. I also check them often.

    There is nothing I hate more than plumbing leaks in my rentals, and I always remind my tenants to call me immediately when they spot a leak.

    As far as the lenght of the supply lines, I don't worry about them bending. Just make sure the ends come to the connection points in a straight line, so no weak points are being created. If your supply line is too long, a complete loop will not affect your water pressure at all.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: length of braided steel toilet hose

    As the others have said, you can use pretty much whatever kind of hose you want. For the record, I've seen more split solid tubing supplies than I have hoses of any kind, so it's really a matter of checking things periodically to make sure they're in serviceable condition.

    In answer to your question, the length of hose doesn't really matter, just as long as there is no tension on the couplings and the hose is not kinked. IMHO, a little longer is better. A mild "S" curve is fine, a full loop is ok too, keep in mind that longer hoses cost more, so excessive length should be avoided.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: length of braided steel toilet hose

    Thanks, folks.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,095

    Default Re: length of braided steel toilet hose

    Replace washing machine hoses every two years and even the cheap ones will never be a problem. For supplies I've gone to the grey PEX. I buy a handful of the longest ones then cut to length as needed. Always a perfect fit, lasts as long as the faucet or fill valve, never a leak, and cheap enough to replace every time service is done. More than the material they're made of, time is the factor that kills flexible supply lines and they all age at the same rate and they die from the inside out. The insides are pretty much the same for rubber, braided or stainless hoses. The braided ones are pretty but fail at the crimped connections which the PEX supplies don't have since they are a one piece molding. This is one place where cheaper is better and maintenance is necessary but rarely performed.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: length of braided steel toilet hose

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastercarpentry View Post
    Replace washing machine hoses every two years and even the cheap ones will never be a problem. For supplies I've gone to the grey PEX. I buy a handful of the longest ones then cut to length as needed. Always a perfect fit, lasts as long as the faucet or fill valve, never a leak, and cheap enough to replace every time service is done. More than the material they're made of, time is the factor that kills flexible supply lines and they all age at the same rate and they die from the inside out. The insides are pretty much the same for rubber, braided or stainless hoses. The braided ones are pretty but fail at the crimped connections which the PEX supplies don't have since they are a one piece molding. This is one place where cheaper is better and maintenance is necessary but rarely performed.
    Oh, I LIKE that! The guy who wrote about his hose failing said it was at the crimp.
    How long should they last? There are a few in this house already (under various sinks) so I don't know how old they are.

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