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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,438

    Default Water for drinking

    What water are you drinking?

    I've seen many studies on water quality. I've seen many drinking water taste tests. I've seen many drinking water commercials. I've seen many water filtration systems. I've replaced many water pipes and seen sediments, mineral, junk.

    The question is: what water are you drinking, and why?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,617

    Default Re: Water for drinking

    I purchase water in 40 gallon lots from a local purified water producer.

    Reasons for doing so, taste, chemical free, and no fluoride (a toxic heavy metal that DOES NOT prevent tooth decay ). And if it makes a difference, we use BPA free water jugs to transport and store the water in.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    5,438

    Default Re: Water for drinking

    Spruce,

    How big are your BPA free jugs? 5 gal each?
    How fast do you finish 40 gal?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,622

    Default Re: Water for drinking

    I have a well. Get good water and minerals.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,617

    Default Re: Water for drinking

    40 gallons lasts three adults about a week.

    Jack, our house water is supplied by municipal well, which is in the plume of toxic waste from an airbase. You could drink it if you wanted to, but I wouldn't recommend it.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
    Posts
    1,183

    Default Re: Water for drinking

    We are on City water that comes from a reverse osmosis plant. The water is great but were not sure what there doing with the with the waste from the plant.

    John

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,509

    Default Re: Water for drinking

    I live dangerously, on the wild side and drink from the tap.

    Our city water barely hits the minimum standards to not glow in the dark or turn into a gel by itself.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    116

    Default Re: Water for drinking

    Tap water, from our well that is 256' deep. We've had it tested for metals, anions (nitrate, phosphate, etc.), e-coli and other organisms, etc.

    Compared with other hazards, water is one of if not the safest thing we have in the USA (especially municipal water).

    Cheers.
    BTW-Fluoride is not a heavy metal. Chemically, fluorine is a halogen and fluoride is its anion. It may not be as beneficial as one is lead to believe, but it is also not harmful as some think. In the
    'non-fluoridated' rural area I live in, an observation of general dental health kind of suggests that it does offer some benefits.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,438

    Default Re: Water for drinking

    So far I see a wide variety of sources for drinking water. The goal is to have drinking water which purer, cleaner and tastier than the average, at a reasonable cost.

    Houston, there's got to be a filtration system out there, that can improve your drinking water, to minimize your risks.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,509

    Default Re: Water for drinking

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    So far I see a wide variety of sources for drinking water. The goal is to have drinking water which purer, cleaner and tastier than the average, at a reasonable cost.

    Houston, there's got to be a filtration system out there, that can improve your drinking water, to minimize your risks.
    I do have a whole house filter, one for sediment and large beasties, the other is charcoal. They get swapped out every few months when the water pressure at the kitchen sink takes a nose dive.

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