+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1

    Question water in the basement

    Hi: we're new homeowners, and soon after we bought the house, there was a major rain in the area, and the basement flooded. it didn't happen again though, we've been very lucky. But every time it rains there's some slight amount of water coming in underneath the wall, like it's filtering through the ground. My question is what kind of professional should I consult to see what should be done. I'm clueless, and afraid of being ripped off. We live in NJ. Thank you
    Fabb

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    208

    Default Re: water in the basement

    Fabb:

    Buried under the perimeter of your basement wall footings will be a perforated pipe called the "weeping tile". The job of that weeping tile is to allow excess ground water to drain away.

    Typically, that weeping tile will connect to either a sump pit in your basement, or to a floor drain typically located in the laundry room area of your basement.

    If you can tell us whether your house has a sump pit or a floor drain it would help.

    Occasionally those weeping tiles will get clogged up with dirt, but it's more common to have basements back up with water because the water isn't draining away fast enough. That's because in lots of towns and cities, it was common to have the laundry room floor drain connect to the main sewer line leaving the house. The problem is that this sewer line would get partially clogged up with solids (mostly from the kitchen sink). When that happens, and you get a torrential rain, then the ground water can come into your laundry room area floor drain FASTER than it can drain away through a partially clogged main sewer line. The result is that your basement floods with water that DOESN'T stink like sewer water. So, in those instances, the fix is really to have the main sewer line from the house snaked to clear it.

    If there's water coming in through your basement walls, it could be that your weeping tiles are clogged up. If they were carrying away excess ground water, that would very much reduce the hydrostatic pressure driving the water into your basement walls.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: water in the basement

    Our basement would flood occasionally but it was always due to the sump or main sewer drain being clogged.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •