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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    11

    Default Mixing moldings?

    In our renovated second floor, not all the new doorframes can accommodate moldings as wide as our original 4.5" moldings. In some cases, there is room on one side of the door, but not the other for a 4.5" molding. In such a case, is it better to use the wide molding where it fits, and then trim it to fit the narrow side? Or should I buy a different, narrower molding for the side that won't take the wide molding? Or is it preferable to use an entirely different, narrow molding for these problem doorframes so that the trim is the same on all sides of the door? I realize that this might be a question of taste/style, but I can't figure out what would look best. Is there any rule of thimb on this?

    Pre-renovation, in many cases our door moldings simply disappeared into the wall where something had been added or changed, but I never liked the way that looked since it made the space seem smaller or chopped up. So maybe it would be better to give each door a complete set of matched moldings, even though that means I will end up with very different moldings on the same hallway...

    Any thoughts or opinions on this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
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    1,203

    Default Re: Mixing moldings?

    My rule (which has to be flexible) is to use the same molding except if the cut-down part is an absurdly small strip and would be hidden on the hinge side in a corner behind an always-open door. And inside closets can be plain flat stock, like a 1x4.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Mixing moldings?

    i always use the same molding for everywhere and rip it down when it wont fit normally.

    if you go to a trim supplier, they will usually have different widths of teh same profile which may work or you wont have to spend as much on a peice that has to be ripped anyway. big box stores rarely carry different widths unless its flat stock
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    11

    Default Re: Mixing moldings?

    THanks for your ideas, Casey and jkirk. Tomorrow I am going to visit Smoots lumber, which is the big lumber warehouse in these parts, and will see what they can do for me...I like the idea of buying narrower pieces of the same trim, rather than having to buy lots of complete pieces and cut it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Mixing moldings?

    the supplier i get all my trim for doing complete homes either new house or high end reno is vintage mouldings

    www.vintagemouldings.ca
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,203

    Default Re: Mixing moldings?

    Smoot/Alex. VA. is a full-service mill, too.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Mixing moldings?

    Quote Originally Posted by jkirk View Post
    the supplier i get all my trim for doing complete homes either new house or high end reno is vintage mouldings

    www.vintagemouldings.ca
    THanks for passing along that supplier. It was interesting to check out their website. The problem is I would like to do a high end reno but I have a low end budget, so I will probably not be able to do custom milled moldings. But we'll see what I find out tomorrow!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Mixing moldings?

    well i wouldnt say vintage has custom milled moldings, there stuff is just the closest to the older trims used in the early 1900's only its mdf. the thing i like/hate about their trim is that its actually hdf (high density fibreboard) its much tougher than the mdf trim sold in big box stores and they put 7 coats of primer on it sanding between coats... this adds to the cost

    the thing i hate is how i have to switch to a 16 gauge nailer to install it most of teh time. the 18 gauge nailer doesnt want to sink into it. especially when installing window sils and baseboard
    fire up the saw and make some dust

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