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Thread: Leaking pipes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Post Leaking pipes

    Over the last eighteen months I have experinced four leaks in 1/2inch copper pipes. The leaks occurred in various parts of the house so I have initially discounted a defective pipe. The leaks are in the pipe itself and not the joints. So far the leaks have always been in the cold water pipes. The leaks start out as a drip and then get progressively worse. The electrical house ground has been checked. Need help!

  2. #2
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    Feb 2010
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    Default Re: Leaking pipes

    How old is the home, is it on a slab or do you have a basement or crawl space? More information is need before your questions can be answered.

    John

  3. #3
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    Jun 2011
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    Post Re: Leaking pipes

    The house was completely renovated about 9 years ago. It's on a slab but only the baseboard heating pipes and the main water line run under the slab. All the pipes that have developed leaks are in the 1st floor ceiling or the walls. There is no attic. The only change to the town's water supply was that about 2 years ago they added chlorine to the water. The house is located in Nassau County, New York.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Leaking pipes

    At this point, after having multiple tiny leaks in various pipes, I wouldn't trust the entire piping system, and would definately repipe.

    The question is with what?

    We don't know what's in the water, we don't know how old the copper pipes are, but a quick and inexpensive option would be to repipe with PEX.

    Ask local plumbers or inquire in your building dept if PEX is approved in your town, and go from there.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Leaking pipes

    It's time to re pipe. The copper lines that are leaking must be the original copper lines. You didn't mention the age of the home. But copper should last longer then 9 years. Chances are the old lines were reused in the remodel.

    John

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Leaking pipes

    Electrolysis, most likely they didn't use dielectric unions when connecting to steel pipe, boiler, water heater, or before going into slab. You will have to repipe as there is no cure. Pex is the only way to go anymore.
    "Lead by Example"

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Leaking pipes

    Quote Originally Posted by ZZZ View Post
    Electrolysis, most likely they didn't use dielectric unions when connecting to steel pipe, boiler, water heater, or before going into slab. You will have to repipe as there is no cure. Pex is the only way to go anymore.
    Dielectric unions would not cause the leaks throughout the home. They only have a effect at the point the two dissimilar metals join.

    John

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Leaking pipes

    We all agree that the only cure is to repipe. The faster, the better. PEX, if to code in your city or new copper.

    Just do it to avoid more water damage.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Los Angeles, CA
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    Default Re: Leaking pipes

    Good call John!

    Te cheaper thinner walled (M) copper which is only used on non pressurized lines now, because of its proven pin hole past and not lasting the test of time. Was legal 15 years or later for presurized water line installation and sorry to your misfortune you are seeing its wrath, my apologies.
    The (L) and (K) type copper piping are the standard now and will last 40, 50 plus years with out problems as long as the piping is reamed and secured correctly from abrassion and movement.
    (L) copper is twice as thick as M copper and (K) copper twice as thick as L, I personally, (been plumbing for over 30 years) prefer copper piping over Pex for its sturdiness, rigidity and hard to puncture qualities. Pex is great for radiat floor heating, (its buried in floor leveler, protected) and Trailers. The security of welded fittings and Puncture resistance is my professional choice.
    Yes a complete repipe is in order, sorry about he extra expense this will cost you, yet done right, by a professional, it will outlive you and I.
    Hope this helps, Chris

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