+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    11

    Default floor installation

    Do you install a floating or other flooring left to right or start in the middle and travel to either end.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    26

    Default Re: floor installation

    Hey Banktpg1,

    When installing wood or laminate floors you normally start in the corner against the longest wall. You also lay the flooring in the direction of the main light source, or longways across the floor. Hope this helps. Here is a link on basic install instructions.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    26

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: floor installation

    floating floors and all wood types of floors are started at the corner and installed teh length of the room typically, the only thing to take into consideration is to check the opposite walls for parrallel so you dont end up with wedge shaped peices at the closing wall

    tile is layed out from wall to wall but the layout typically starts at the center of teh room, you find center then base the layout off of this, either making for a more aesthetically correct floor or so you have to make the least amount of cuts
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,751

    Default Re: floor installation

    Both are good answers, but let me add this:

    1. When laying down wood, laminate or tile, leave 1/4" space to the walls. Base molding will cover the gap later.

    2. Be prepared: for tile floors you will have many cuts, there is really no way around it. Most cuts can be done with a hand tile cutter, but complicated cuts (around door jambs) must be done with a tile saw (like MK).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,239

    Default Re: floor installation

    Quote Originally Posted by jkirk View Post
    floating floors and all wood types of floors are started at the corner and installed teh length of the room typically, the only thing to take into consideration is to check the opposite walls for parrallel so you dont end up with wedge shaped peices at the closing wall

    tile is layed out from wall to wall but the layout typically starts at the center of teh room, you find center then base the layout off of this, either making for a more aesthetically correct floor or so you have to make the least amount of cuts
    Depends on the intricacy of the layout, such as an open floor plan with many rooms connected by hallway. When I installed mine I laid out from the centerline of the hallway that started at the front door and went through to the back of the house. From there I laid it both directions to fill the kitchen, dining room and a perpendicular hallway terminating at a 1/2 bath.

    The flooring I used had a standard T&G edge, so laying in either direction was a piece of cake. With the advent of today's "click-n-go" flooring, one must start at the wall and work across the room because the flooring really only wants to go together in a specific manner, work backwards from that and the job becomes impossible. The cure here, is to lay out from the center-line of your sight line and snap a reference line. Now measure an equal distance to the starting wall from each end of the line and snap a second line near the wall. This becomes your starting line to lay the floor from one direction.

    As DJ said, leave at least 1/4" gap (read the packaging for manufacturer's recommendation ) along all walls and stationary objects (cabinets, door jambs, etc. ). This is to allow for expansion and contraction of the flooring material. Door jambs can be under cut so that the flooring slides under the jamb and trim, but you still need the gap to the wall and framing behind the jamb and trim.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •