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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sombreuil_mongrel View Post
    Thin plywood paneling right over studs (I have seen this done!) seems particularly bad for a firewall, wouldn't you think?
    Very common in early trailers, mobile homes, and manufactured houses. Don't get me started about how bad these pieces of crud are!
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  2. #12
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    May 2008
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    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    > Panels are so 1960s. Like the popcorn ceilings...

    No popcorn ceilings in this '60s ranch - got those 9" x 9" asbestos ceiling tiles instead. I'm much prefer the popcorn ceiling.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    Quote Originally Posted by crylakel View Post
    > Panels are so 1960s. Like the popcorn ceilings...

    No popcorn ceilings in this '60s ranch - got those 9" x 9" asbestos ceiling tiles instead. I'm much prefer the popcorn ceiling.
    You may want to rethink purchasing this property.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #14
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    May 2008
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    New England
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    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    Is there no "hope" for a 1960s ranch with paneled walls & asbestos ceiling?

    Can't this type of ceiling be removed safely? Or covered over with another surface? The home inspector will take a sample but I gotta believe there are still a lot of houses out there w/these ceilings. Isn't asbestos OK as long as its not disturbed?

    Help me out here, wise Spruce ... what are some options (besides walking away?) .... what if I can get sellers to pay for complete remediation?

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    My 3 cents:

    1. There's "hope" to this house, and yes, there are many homes like this one around.

    2. If you can get the seller to pay for the asbestos cleanup, which is entirely possible in today's "buyer's market", and if you like to purchase this property, then do it. Keep in mind that in most or all states, the cleanup must be done by a lic. asbestos removal contractor, so check the details before signing an offer, or write the offer "subject to asbestos cleanup by a lic. asbestos contractor, to be paid in escrow by the seller".

    3. Left undisturbed, asbestos is OK. It is actually in more places that you can imagine and was widely used for many years. It turns toxic only when it becomes dust in the air.
    However, if you want to buy this house, you want to make sure it's asbestos free, for your own peace of mind.

    good luck.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    New England
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    118

    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    Glad to hear there's hope. Thanx for the advise.

    The home inspector asked if there were any specific concerns, and I mentioned the asbestos ceiling. He said he would take a sample and send to a lab. There's little doubt in my mind cuz they look exactly like those on various web sites,
    like http://inspectapedia.com/sickhouse/asbestoslookA.htm

    There are a few w/gaps between, so I guess I'm more concerned if any particles have found their way into the forced air system (heat and A/C) and been circulated. I've already mentioned the asbestos ceilings to agent - and she has passed concern along to sellers. So it should come as no surprise what the inspection may turn up.

    Can't one install some decorative bead board over them - its a rustic location so between paneled wall, bead board wouldn't be out of place. It beats white tiles.

  7. #17
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    Quote Originally Posted by crylakel View Post
    Is there no "hope" for a 1960s ranch with paneled walls & asbestos ceiling?

    Can't this type of ceiling be removed safely? Or covered over with another surface? The home inspector will take a sample but I gotta believe there are still a lot of houses out there w/these ceilings. Isn't asbestos OK as long as its not disturbed?

    Help me out here, wise Spruce ... what are some options (besides walking away?) .... what if I can get sellers to pay for complete remediation?
    You might be able to get the seller to clear the asbestos, but don't count on it. Abatement is usually quite expensive, and if the seller opts to do it themselves, there's no guarantee that they've even remotely tried to be careful about it. If it were me, I'd remove it myself, HOWEVER, get bids for abatement prior to buying as negotiation power. As an example, if it costs $10K to abate, you can split that cost with the seller.

    As dj said, as long as it's not friable, asbestos poses no danger. Again, the caveat here is that when it's removed it's done carefully, in a controlled manner to prevent particles from breaking free during the removal process and polluting the entire house. You could leave the tiles in place and paint over them, the paint will seal in the fiber as long as it remains undisturbed.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    118

    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    > Abatement is usually quite expensive, and if the seller opts to do it themselves,

    Yup, heard it can be expensive and I would guess quite a time consuming project with all the rules and regulations re: removal of hazardous materials. In fact I think that once the samples are sent to a lab, "someone" will then track the case to find out what's being done.

    Its highly unlikely the sellers will do anything themselves. The sellers are handling an estate and don't appear to know much about the home, or be that handy. But I feel 100x better now after getting all the expert feedback about the paneling not being a fire hazard and how the ceiling could be painted (if not flaking and cracking). Mucho thanx - will let ya know how the inspection goes.

  9. #19
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    As a homeowner, you're hands won't be as tied with abatement rules and restrictions as a professional's would. Just do a bit of research and use care when dealing with it and you'll be fine.

    As for the paneling, you can paint it for now to improved the aesthetics, then as time and money are available, attack it one room at a time. With any luck it's just nailed and not glued to the walls, this will save a bunch of work, mess and headaches in the repair of the drywall or plaster that is behind it.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    118

    Default Re: are paneled walls a fire hazard?

    > As a homeowner, you're hands won't be as tied with abatement rules and restrictions as a professional's would


    Am guessing that painting is the simplest option for a diy homeowner (if one doesn't wish to go the professional abatement route) cuz removal & disposing of them must be a challenge. Plus, where would one even "bring" asbestos tiles in this day and age for disposal?

    Since we're on the subject of this 1960s home's "flaws", the other interesting thing is that there's no interior staircase to the basement. They accessed the basement (where washer/dryer are) via the connected one car garage, or a back basement door (no hatch since basement isn't below grade). Am think a spiral staircase makes the most sense - takes up the least amount of valuable floor space.

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