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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    8

    Default Painting Front Door

    I painted my front door (outside) and for months it stuck to the door seal. I had removed the seal while painting and had left it off for several weeks to avoid contact between the seal and the paint, to allow the paint time to dry. Eventually, after replacing the seal it started sticking to the paint, and eventually, the paint which was in contact with the seal was stripped from the door and ended up on the seal. The paint used was an alkyd paint. I need to repaint. Do you have any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    Default Re: Painting Front Door

    Are you sure you were using an alkyd (oil) paint? Such a situation is common where latex paints were used. Oil paints ,however, dry hard and get more so with age. They do not exhibit the sticky quality you describe.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    8

    Default Re: Painting Front Door

    Thanks for your responce.
    Nope. You were right. i went sarching for the old can which I fortunately kept in my garage. It was an acrylic latex paint. I guess I should have used alkyd. However I am concerned about drying time. Is there an additive for alkyd, to accelerate drying time as I will have to lock this door at the end of the day, for security. Further I have been told by Lowes that they are phasing out oil based paints. Have you heard of this? Is it industry wide or just Lowes?
    Thanks again for your help.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    1,804

    Default Re: Painting Front Door

    Joe,

    Oil is getting harder and harder to find. The government VOC requirements are clamping down on it. The Big Box stores are dropping it. You should go to a paint store that caters to professional painters ( yes Spruce, I do recommend customers go elsewhere on occasion! ).

    You can speed up the dry time of oil paint by adding a cap full of "japan drier" to a gallon of paint. You might ask the paint store to add a few drops of the drier into your quart of paint. A quart of japan drier is a lifetime supply for even a professional painter! I would paint your door early in the morning. When it was cold out, I would cut a sheet of styrofoam to seat against the door frame if the door did not have a storm door. Most trim paints dry within several hours if it is warm and not damp.

    If you have the type of weatherstripping that can be temporarily removed from its track, remove it so that it will not seat against the face of the door until the paint is thoroughly dry.

    You can paint over the old latex, but it would be better to remove it and start over. The latex paint is probably not overly well stuck to the old finish, especially if the underlying finish was oil paint. That is why it pulled off where the weatherstripping seated. The quality of the finish is only as good as the paint upon which it sits.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,160

    Default Re: Painting Front Door

    Quote Originally Posted by ordjen View Post
    ( yes Spruce, I do recommend customers go elsewhere on occasion! )
    Hey, if I didn't bust your stones once in a while, how would you know I cared?
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Painting Front Door

    Quote Originally Posted by ordjen View Post
    Joe,

    Oil is getting harder and harder to find. The government VOC requirements are clamping down on it. The Big Box stores are dropping it. You should go to a paint store that caters to professional painters ( yes Spruce, I do recommend customers go elsewhere on occasion! ).

    You can speed up the dry time of oil paint by adding a cap full of "japan drier" to a gallon of paint. You might ask the paint store to add a few drops of the drier into your quart of paint. A quart of japan drier is a lifetime supply for even a professional painter! I would paint your door early in the morning. When it was cold out, I would cut a sheet of styrofoam to seat against the door frame if the door did not have a storm door. Most trim paints dry within several hours if it is warm and not damp.

    If you have the type of weatherstripping that can be temporarily removed from its track, remove it so that it will not seat against the face of the door until the paint is thoroughly dry.

    You can paint over the old latex, but it would be better to remove it and start over. The latex paint is probably not overly well stuck to the old finish, especially if the underlying finish was oil paint. That is why it pulled off where the weatherstripping seated. The quality of the finish is only as good as the paint upon which it sits.
    Thanks for this advice. I will check a paint store as you suggested.
    Thanks again.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Fargo, ND
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: Painting Front Door

    OP-
    What color was that Latex paint??
    What exact Brand/Series & Sheen??

    Deeper colors can take forever to cure hard enough....
    Weather and humidity are big factors too.

    To prevent future sticking....just apply a light dusting of Talcum-powder/similiar to the insulation strips or jams that the door closes against.
    This is what's done to prevent cakes from sticking to pans!

    As Ordjen states....get all the existing finish off, clean, re-prime, and re-paint.
    Use at least a Satin-sheen exterior paint of top quality!!!

    FPE has some Glosses that will make you sick...they're so good!
    Cheap...NO. Stunning...H*ll yeah.

    Faron

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,804

    Default Re: Painting Front Door

    Faron is right about dark colors having greater drying times, at least those that are mixed with universal colorants at the paint store. Most universal colorants are glycol based. Very dark colors can have as much as 15 ounces of colorant added.

    This is not true of factory mixed colors. The factory mixes paint from dry colorant powders. Factory mixed colors will usually have better hiding ability than the same color mixed with universal colorants at the paint store. Unfortunately, stock, factory colors are now very limited.

    You will be better off if you can modify a stock color with a minimum amount of universal colorant, i.e. a maroon can easily be dulled down from a stock bright red, etc. Better yet would be to blend with factory mixed paint colors, rather than with universal colorants.

    Home Depot will soon be changing over to water based colorants, ostensibly to lower VOCs. I personally believe that a lot of problems with dark colors will also be lessened when the new colorants are introduced. There are very few oil paints at Home Depot these days, and virtually no formulas for mixing what is still carried, so universal colorants are not really needed.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,197

    Default Re: Painting Front Door

    Fine Paints of Europe "Hollandlac Brilliant" (super high gloss) is the best front door paint obtainable. It goes on and covers exceptionally, dries hard in a day. The price tag is like $60/qt., however. It's an oil paint, BTW. I'm saving up to buy a sample of it ;-)
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Fargo, ND
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: Painting Front Door

    S-G,

    You won't be sorry!
    I was lucky to sample some of their stuff, and yes, that Hollandlac-Brilliant is scary-good!
    I can read newspaper-print in the reflection!!!
    (It's a beautiful deep green..."Coach Green", on a crappy pallet board, that I applied 2 coats with a FOAM brush!)

    NOTHING like it domestically-made, sorry. You may literally be stunned how good it looks on a properly-prepared pallet-board...!

    Faron

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