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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    50

    Default Kitchen to Garage door replacement

    I'm considering replacing a flat wood veneer door with a wood or fiberglass full-view door from the kitchen to the garage. I'd like to get a slab, rather than a pre-hung unit, since the frame is fine and the door is a standard 32" x 80" x 1 3/4". I'd also like it to be as energy efficient as possible. My thinking is that a swing-type patio door is the closest to what I want. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    26

    Default Re: Kitchen to Garage door replacement

    Hey Coblas,

    You must have a pretty nice garage to want to see it from the kitchen. I couldn't be happier that the door to my garage is solid. It's such a mess I don't want anyone to even know it exists.

    The door connecting your home to your garage is suppose to be a fire rated door. A fire rated door is rated by how long it will stop a fire from spreading from room to room. The average is about 60 minutes. So if your garage catches on fire it wont spread to your home quickly. Check your local code and see if you can change the door. A fire door doesn't have any glass.-Gregg

    COMMUNITY.HOMEDEPOT.COM

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: Kitchen to Garage door replacement

    I did look into the fire rated door code with my local planning board. Haven't heard back yet. It would be a bit ironic if the current door is acceptable, since it's hollow and not likely to be much help in the event of a fire. No, my garage isn't that nice. It's just been a pet peeve for years that, the way my house is configured, I can't see someone come up the driveway unless I'm looking out the living room window. A full-view garage door would allow me good visibility from the kitchen (and wouldn't change the garage view for anyone else). I've investigated other possible solutions, but keep finding reasons for why they wouldn't work out. I thought this door maneuver would do the trick (cost being the next hurdle), but I guess it's too simple an answer. Thank you for your input.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,821

    Default Re: Kitchen to Garage door replacement

    If you go from a hollow core door which probably only has 2 hinges you will need 3 or 4 hinges for a fully lighted door, they are much heavier. I would suggest you consider a pre-hung door unless you have experience mortising doors and frames.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: Kitchen to Garage door replacement

    The weight of the door is a good point. The hollow core door I have now has 3 hinges, but I figured I'd change them to larger, heavy duty exterior door hinges for a full view door. I can manage chipping out the mortises more easily than removing and replacing a prehung unit. It still might require a pro, though, because of the weight, and I'm a little concerned about using a fiberglass replacement door which I understand is not as accommodating as wood if trimming is needed.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: Kitchen to Garage door replacement

    Well, it appears that a 45 min. fire-rated door is the order of the day. Interestingly, some even have full glass. However, I'd have to forego the insulation benefit provided by an exterior door. Unfortunately, the closest I could find to what I want (wood or fiberglass, rather than steel or aluminum) is from a company located in Australia, China, Malaysia, New Zealand, South Africa, and Thailand. Oh, well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,663

    Default Re: Kitchen to Garage door replacement

    Quote Originally Posted by coblas View Post
    Well, it appears that a 45 min. fire-rated door is the order of the day. Interestingly, some even have full glass. However, I'd have to forego the insulation benefit provided by an exterior door. Unfortunately, the closest I could find to what I want (wood or fiberglass, rather than steel or aluminum) is from a company located in Australia, China, Malaysia, New Zealand, South Africa, and Thailand. Oh, well.
    Not to argue with you, but the latest and earlier editions of the International Residential Code requires a solid core wood door, metal door or a 20 minute rated door between a garage and a house.
    If you asked your building department what rating is required for a one hour rated wall, the 45 minute answer is correct(usually). 20 minute rated doors can made full view. Wire glass or ceramic glass is required I think. 20 minute doors are made in the U.S.
    I installed a driveway alarm at my house. It's a motion sensor and a transmitter with a receiver inside. It works like a charm to let me know when somebody arrives or deer are grazing in my front yard.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: Kitchen to Garage door replacement

    Thank you for your input, ed21. It's helpful to get ideas for how to handle this. The 45-min. fire rating was provided to me by local code enforcement. I was encouraged to change the door to meet this standard, since the original door, installed when the house was built in 1971, is hollow. I also was told that full view glass doors in wood or fiberglas are available with this rating and to check with Lowe's and Home Depot. No luck. I found a couple of full view options in fiberglas or wood either well-insulated or fire rated, but not both, on the internet. I will check with local distributors for more info. when I have a chance.

    I investigated the type of alarm you mentioned in the past, but various considerations have made it problematic, not the least of which is living in the woods so moving branches would trigger the alarm frequently. As it is, the floodlight with a motion sensor at the eave above my garage door goes on often, even with the sensitivity adjusted (but without an alarm). Installing the receiver at the end of my 200'+ driveway where trees are less of an issue would require installing a pole, or attaching the receiver to the mailbox post where it would be blocked by snow in the winter. Hardwiring vs. batteries, well, both aren't great ideas.

    I do appreciate your suggestions.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,663

    Default Re: Kitchen to Garage door replacement

    The battery at the sending unit lasts for at least a year in mine. I did mount it on about a three foot pole & built an enclosure like a bird house. I do get birds trying to nest in it in the spring and that sets it off, but the moving branches of a bush across from it doesn't.
    Snow will block it occasionally. I wouldn't mount it to a mailbox if it's subject to snowplows or traffic. Besides mailbox baseball is a common sport where I live.
    I've got a crappy motion detector light that worked right when I first bought it, but now randomly turns on, so I know it's not the trees that does it.

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