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Thread: Bathtub

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default Bathtub

    I am trying to remove an old cast iron bathtub and have so far been able to loosen and remove two of the slip nuts which connect the overflow and the shoe drain via the access panel behind the tub. My question is whether it would be possible to remove the bathtub w/o having to remove the drain flange since I was able to remove both slip nuts? The drain flange is an old two prong spud that will not turn. Does anyone have any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
    Posts
    1,183

    Default Re: Bathtub

    Chances are your going to have to replace and relocate the existing waste & overflow to fit the new tub. Cut the old shoe off from the access panel behind the tub.

    John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,509

    Default Re: Bathtub

    Are ou trying to salvage this tub?

    If not, then cover it with a movers' blanket and smash it with a sledge hammer into pieces you can carry out of the house by yourself. Aim for the flat spots in the bottom to create a crack. Once cracked its fairly easy to break up. Smash around the drain, leaving it in place until the rest of the tub is out, giving you more room to get at it.

    Be careful and wear eye protection as the cast iron can be sharp.

    The cast iron is recyclable.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Bathtub

    Once the bathtub is broken up and I have gained frontal access to the waste and overflow, are the pipes that connect where the slip nuts were attached be easy to pull apart? The waste and overflow assembly is made of brass and I was assuming that these pipes are only connected by pushing the smaller pipe inside the larger pipe and attaching a slip nut.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,509

    Default Re: Bathtub

    Yes you are correct. Usually the cast iron around the drain flange is the thinnest and easier to break into tiny pieces. By the time you get down to that area, you'll be able to reach easily to all the parts for dis-assembly.

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