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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Abington, PA
    Posts
    6

    Default Crawl space dehumidifier.... how big?

    I'm just outside Philadelphia. My crawl space gets water during heavy rain. Do I need one of the expensive crawl space dehumidifiers sold by basement companies or will a unit from Sears or Best Buy do the same thing for less?

    The units I was looking at were a Sani Dry CSB 90 pint unit which is about $1,300

    and

    Fridigadare 70 pint unit which is only around $300

    Can someone tell me why the Sani Dry unit is so much more? Is it worth it? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Crawl space dehumidifier.... how big?

    Lippy,
    This boils down to an old saying that my father used to tell me "You get what you pay for." Sure the Frigidaire model might only be $300 dollars, but how many will you have to buy in the span of 5 years? Do they have warranties that are going to cover there product if you place it into a crawlspace? I personally recommend Santa Fe dehumidifiers myself for crawlspaces. They have various makes and models to fit any type of crawlspaces or crawlspace conditions. They also have a gravity drain discharge system that allows the units to discharge water automatically from the dehumidifier, instead of you having to go down into your crawlspace every couple of days to manually remove the water. But I would strongly recommend encapsulating your crawlspace first before installing a dehumidifier. This will prevent any excess water and humidity from entering your crawlspace and will add to the life of the dehumidifier that you plan on purchasing. In retrospect the dehumidifier will not have to work as hard to evacuate the excess moisture out of your crawl. For some more information on this subject I recommend that you go to http://crawlspacedehumidifiers.org This page will help answer some of your questions and concerns regarding your crawlspace dehumidifier. Hope this helps..

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Crawl space dehumidifier.... how big?

    i completely agree with derek on this one. the other thing to do is to put down a layer of plastic and then pour concrete so the moisture cant come up into the crawl space
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Abington, PA
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Crawl space dehumidifier.... how big?

    My crawl space already has a poured concrete floor (however it was never smoothed!) Does that make a difference? Its more like a mini, basement.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Crawl space dehumidifier.... how big?

    I would seriously consider encapsulating your crawlspace with a heavy duty vapor barrier still even though its concrete. If they did not place a vapor barrier underneath the concrete before they poured moisture will still seep through. And if your crawlspace has any vents to the outside in your foundation walls the moisture will still get into your houses envelope and cause moisture problems. Crawlspace vents are not required by building codes so it is not a issue if you seal them off completely. ( i recommend taking out the vents all together and replacing it with a cinder block to completely ensure that its properly sealed and is not going to allow insects or critters to sneak in.) Look at your crawlspace as part of your house (which it is) Would you leave open windows in your basement in the middle of winter? Then why would you want open vents in your crawlspace? If you encapsulate your crawlspace completely and correctly you will have a mini basement so to speak. For a lot of good information on this subject visit http://crawlspaceinfo.com This website should answer all of your questions. Hope this a help to you.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Abington, PA
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Crawl space dehumidifier.... how big?

    Thanks Derek.

    Luckily, my crawlspace does not have outside vents.

    We just had LOTS of rain. The crawlspace is wet, but not as bad as I thought it would be. I would assume the problem of the water coming in would need to be fixed before encapsulation, right?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Crawl space dehumidifier.... how big?

    Howdy, consider first making the slop of soils away from the dwg .1/4" per foot minimum. Be sure any down spouts drain away from the foundation 6 to 8'. If no rain gutters install them and drain away again from the foundation. Beofre yo spend$$ in crawlspace...
    Yes the soils need to be dry to install vapor barriers... or else you get really muddy lol

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Crawl space dehumidifier.... how big?

    Just because the mold you see is black in color doesn't mean it's the infamous "black mold" that everyone talks about. That particular type of toxic mold is VERY rare. Most mold is harmless, especially if it's not in the living area of the home.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Crawl space dehumidifier.... how big?

    Lippy,

    Yes you want to fix the problems from the outside first. Mr. Miller is correct, check the gutters like he said and what he said about the soil is (in simple terms) You need to make the grade of the dirt on your foundation walls higher than the surrounding soil around your house. So that water will drain away from your foundation not to it!! This should fix your water problem. I would also check for cracks in your foundation walls and seal them with quikrete mortar repair. (this product comes in caulking tubes and is really easy to work with!) Then I would suggest placing drain tile tubing around the inside perimeter of your crawlspace and connect them to a sump basin with a sump pump inside of it. This will make sure that you are effectively evacuating the water getting into your crawlspace efficiently. I know you have concrete in your crawl so you might have to get a hammer drill with a chisel bit to break up the concrete, but concrete is usually only a couple inches thick in crawlspaces so it should not be as hard as it sounds. I know this sounds like a lot of work but if you are serious about fixing your problem and fixing it right the first time I strongly recommend taking this advice to heart, hope this helps sir!!

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