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  1. #221
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Build your own cabinets

    Maybe.

    The potential problems I envision would necessitate some manner of "support" up on the table surface itself cause as you sweep the router back and forth/up & down...I think things will get rather unsteady without it. Might get to be quite a handful to control.

  2. #222
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Build your own cabinets

    Either way... I think I would probably do something like this to help me control the router movement. Give the base just enough room under the hold-downs so it can slide freely...and that's all.

    Or perhaps you will think of something better yet.
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  3. #223
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    Sep 2007
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    Default Re: Build your own cabinets

    One of the table tops I made is 54" square. Do you think there is any need to put breadboard ends on the end-grain edges?

  4. #224
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Build your own cabinets

    Depends.

    Is this tabletop also laminated/built up from two layers of 3/4" stock...or similar ? (I think this is what I saw in the pics of the round one you're working on)

    If laminated this way and the lams are alternately flipped as regards the growth rings (both the edge to edge lams and the two layers are more less "opposing" as well)....then likely there is no need for any structural members to restrain a tendency to cupping because that's already built in/glued in.

    And...if this table will also get an under-structure similar to the round one...then that frame should/could serve as restraint.

  5. #225
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Haymarket, VA
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    4

    Cool Re: Build your own cabinets

    Quote Originally Posted by andybuildz View Post
    Finished results will be posted here later this evening I hope...my wifes gonna kill me if i spend any more time on this
    Nice looking pimped out van. Wish my kitchen looked so good.

  6. #226
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    178

    Default Re: Build your own cabinets

    So how loose is loose?

    I have been fitting these mortise and tenons and I overshot one of the joints.

    When it comes to fitting M/T joints, I have gotten used to having to push joints together...not sure why that makes me feel better. I probably should be leaving more space for glue.

    Anywho, one joint I cut too much off the cheeks and it goes together with great ease There is about 1/32" worth of clearance total. Is the general consensus that is too loose? Will normal yellow glue take that up?

  7. #227
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Build your own cabinets

    I'm gonna say....probably/likely if you slather the tenon and the mortise with glue.

    Another tact might be to slather the tenon with glue and keep slathering it for a while until the tenon swells to the size you need, then insert and clamp. (The glue is water-based so swelling should occur *if* you keep it wet long enough.) Moderate brewski consumption allowed while waiting.

    Or...you could mix some wood dust/flour in with your glue to make a loose paste of sorts and use that on the loose portion of the joint.

    Or....you could simply cut a thin shim and slide that in where needed when inserting and gluing the tenon. IOW, add a little wood.

    If this is a blind mortise, one of the above should work fine. There is also the option of making a narrow kerf in the tenon & filling it with a blind foxtail wedge, but this wedge would need to be sized just right so it does what you want it to...but does not prevent the tenon from seating properly. If it gets the job half done and hits home before the tenon is full seated....good luck getting the tenon back out again to have another shot at it. The tenon would be spread from the wedge and tight in the mortise. It be stuck now. Set your brewski down and reach for the hard stuff if this happens.


    If it's a thru mortise-tenon joint, you could do the tenon kerf and then drive a wedge into that after everything is in place and clamped. Cut and sand off the excess wedge that sticks out. If doing this on one joint, you might want to do on all of them for the sake of visual uniformity. You can also do this with a couple kerfs and wedges per tenon for an even more decorative appearance. Use the same or a contrasting wood for the wedges.

  8. #228
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    178

    Default Re: Build your own cabinets

    Hard stuff....LOL!!! Hard stuff for me is something with a boat load of hops and ABV around 7%. :0)

    Thanks for the tips GH. I will play with it tonight and see what I am most comfy with.

    The joints have not been coming out as tight as I would like. I knew putting a tenon on an arch was going to be tricky...so I have to live with it. Lucky for me, the frame is well under the table top so hopefully most will not see it....or there will be so many shadows the eye will not pick it up. anyhow...it looks better than a sheet of plywood on cinder blocks (my plan "B"). I am getting better at marking and cutting close to the layout lines....but it has taken some time to get there.

    I should get the first frame assembled this weekend so I will send a pic when it comes together.

    Thanks again for the support.

    -Walt

  9. #229
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    Aug 2007
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    1,131

    Default Re: Build your own cabinets

    Walt,

    Just in case you find yourself cutting mortises by hand sometime (including blind dovetails) for some reason -

    Lay out your lines and drill a hole in the area where the mortise will be located...if appropriate. Grab your chisel..but DO NOT try to chisel right on/ beside... the layout line at this time.

    Instead, stay back from the line about 1/16" or so and wail away...removing material. Once the bulk of the internal material has been removed for "X" depth, you can then lay your chisel down right on/beside.. the line and remove the sliver of remaining material. If you should instead try to remove to the line from the get-go, the wood around the line will almost certainly mushroom (because of resistance) and spoil both the fit and the final appearance.

    PS- You could also consider using epoxy if these joints are questionable as regards yellow aliphatic glue (Titebond or similar). Epoxy can bridge bigger gaps and still deliver strength. Leave it clear or you could mix in some sanding dust...but do be aware that mixing in dust from the same wood will always render a color closer to the end-grain color of that wood rather than a face-grain color. Your call.)
    Last edited by goldhiller; 11-14-2008 at 11:20 PM.

  10. #230
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    178

    Default Re: Build your own cabinets

    IN case anyone cares...I made up the jig GH suggested for cutting the large chamfer on the table bottom. I attached what the jig looks like and how the cuts came out. I used a .75 dia cutter and then spaced guide pins every .625. I would go around the whole table, move out a pin hole, reset the depth of the cutter and go around again. It took about 4 passes to get to the end of the chamfer...and I did that twice to reduce the depth of cut. The cuts were stepped a little so I hit it with a belt sander to level it out. Overall it took very little time....esp compared to sawing by hand!
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