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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    9

    Default Updated kitchen to GFCIs

    I've read many posts about updated to GFCIs and the fact that you can put one GFCI on a circuit to protect the other outlets on that circuit as well and leave the others as standard outlets. That's what I'm planning....I have 3 outlets around the countertop sink area which I believe should be GFCI protected and will most likely just put a GFCI outlet at the first box in the circuit. The funny thing is, we just bought the house 1 year ago and the fact these outlets were not GFCI outlets didn't come up in the home inspection. It's also odd that all 3 bathrooms have the proper GFCI protection, but someone forgot about the kitchen. The bathrooms are on a separate circuit. I'm wondering if I have a GFCI breaker instead to protect this circuit. Is there a way to check the breaker for this?
    I bought a GFCI outlet tester to check outlets for power as well as testing known GFCI outlets. Is there danger is using the GFCI tester on an outlet that may not be GFCI protected to test it for protection? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    693

    Default Re: Updated kitchen to GFCIs

    Nope.............

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,560

    Default Re: Updated kitchen to GFCIs

    Look at the breaker for this circuit and see if it has a "Push to Test" button on it.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,560

    Default Re: Updated kitchen to GFCIs

    By the way, you said you just bought the house a year ago but you didn't say how old it is. GFCI outlets were required in bathrooms in 1975 but were not required in kitchens until 1987. Updating to current code requirements is not generally required in almost all jurisdictions unless new electrical work is performed.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Shamokin, Pa.
    Posts
    645

    Default Re: Updated kitchen to GFCIs

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    By the way, you said you just bought the house a year ago but you didn't say how old it is. GFCI outlets were required in bathrooms in 1975 but were not required in kitchens until 1987. Updating to current code requirements is not generally required in almost all jurisdictions unless new electrical work is performed.
    Jack
    I agree with JL regarding the dates for GFCIs, etc.
    It is odd that the kitchen outlets did not show up om the home inspection report. I guess you get what you pay for.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Updated kitchen to GFCIs

    Howdy, are the bath outlets GFI plugs? or are they on a GFI circuit breaker in you main elelctrical service panel?
    The kitchen outlets may all be protected by a GFI circuit breaker in your Main Electrical Service Ppanel. Do you know what a GFI circuit breaker looks like verses a non GFI breaker?

    The outlets on your counter can have GFI plugs installed in each one so each is seperatly protected or if you located the fisrt fed outlet and install a GFI plug an wire it to protect everything wired past it. Then you only have to install on GFI the first fed plug But this has a draw back of causeing the GFI to trip more easliy or have goast trips.... Have you determined if all the outlets on the counter are on the same circuit or split on 2 circuits to better handle the load of appliances?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Updated kitchen to GFCIs

    Thanks for the feedback. To answer a few questions... The house was built in '85, so that may explain why the bathroom had GFI and the kitchen did not. The bathroom outlets are GFCI outlets, not a breaker in the service panel. I don't know exactly what a GFCI breaker looks like, but all the breakers in the service panel look alike, none have a "Push to test button" on them. The 3 kitchen outlets that I plan to GFCI protect are on the same circuit. These are the 3 closest to the sink which is what code requires, correct? Only those within 3 feet of a water source? Thought I read that somewhere. There is another outlet above the counter on the other side of the stove, but that's a good 5 or 6 feet from the sink, so I'm thinking it's fine with a standard outlet.
    I've already bought a 3 pack of GFCI outlets and thought I'd go ahead and use all 3 as opposed to protecting all 3 outlets off the same GFCI.
    Next question would be, how to wire these for individual protection? If I wire like the current outlets are, using both hot and both neutral terminals on the first outlet, then I'm basically putting the outlets in series and thus the first GFCI will take out the rest of the circuit if tripped, right? Do I need to pigtail a separate hot, neutral, and ground to the wires coming in and going out of the box versus wiring the lines in and out directly to the outlet?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Shamokin, Pa.
    Posts
    645

    Default Re: Updated kitchen to GFCIs

    Quote Originally Posted by btthor View Post
    Thanks for the feedback. To answer a few questions... The house was built in '85, so that may explain why the bathroom had GFI and the kitchen did not. The bathroom outlets are GFCI outlets, not a breaker in the service panel. I don't know exactly what a GFCI breaker looks like, but all the breakers in the service panel look alike, none have a "Push to test button" on them. The 3 kitchen outlets that I plan to GFCI protect are on the same circuit. These are the 3 closest to the sink which is what code requires, correct? Only those within 3 feet of a water source? Thought I read that somewhere. There is another outlet above the counter on the other side of the stove, but that's a good 5 or 6 feet from the sink, so I'm thinking it's fine with a standard outlet.
    I've already bought a 3 pack of GFCI outlets and thought I'd go ahead and use all 3 as opposed to protecting all 3 outlets off the same GFCI.
    Next question would be, how to wire these for individual protection? If I wire like the current outlets are, using both hot and both neutral terminals on the first outlet, then I'm basically putting the outlets in series and thus the first GFCI will take out the rest of the circuit if tripped, right? Do I need to pigtail a separate hot, neutral, and ground to the wires coming in and going out of the box versus wiring the lines in and out directly to the outlet?
    In these parts all kitchen counter outlet must be GFCI protected, no matter the distance from a sink.
    I would just use one GFCI and by wiring properly you will have protection though out the counter top. The NEC believes ghost trips are a thing from the past.

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