+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2

    Question Attic Conversion

    My house was built in 1925 and has a full attic. Currently the attic has a floor with insulation under it. The floor stops about 12 inches from each side as this is where the eave vents are comming in. There are 2 ceiling vents (non powered) 1 at each end and in the front there is a vent in the wall, about 24 inches square, and a window on the opposite end. I would like to convert the attic into a homes office, but my concern is how to insulate the ceiling while keeping the air flow. I will, of course, replace the vent in the wall with a window to match the other end.
    Currently we noticed that in the winter time when it is very cold ice sometimes forms on the nails sticking thru the ceiling.

    So I guess what I would like to know is how to properly vent the attic prior to putting in the insulation and dry wall.

    Note: I live in north east Ohio.
    Thanks
    Last edited by cfuson; 03-14-2009 at 10:06 AM. Reason: location

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Attic Conversion

    Howdy is the home contructed with ballon walls. I have a grand old home 1905 in Nebraska. I ask because the vents sound similar and ballion walls have no plates between floors so you can get chimneying in the walls... What is the height of your attic from floor to ridge? You can frame in stud walls and ceiling and insullate both then drywall. Leaving air space around the walls and ceiling to let the air circulate in the attic works well.
    The ice is likley condensation, is it on the northern exposure?. Is you attic acess door insullated and tight? Stopping air infiltration from inside the home will reduce the moisture getting into the attic. In spring consider having a couple of roof vents installed at the top of the roof, or a contrinous ridge cap vent, or a opposide side gabel end vent, or add a gabel vent fan to your existing vent- this requirest wiring . These vents let convectionlet the air out of the attic more too.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Attic Conversion

    Thanks for the reply
    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
    Howdy is the home contructed with ballon walls.
    I beleive it could be as there is a laundry chute from 2nd floor to basement and the heat ducts run straight up thru the main interior wall the runs the length of the house.

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
    What is the height of your attic from floor to ridge?
    About 6 foot ( I can stand up and walk thru the very center and I am 6 foot)

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
    You can frame in stud walls and ceiling and insullate both then drywall. Leaving air space around the walls and ceiling to let the air circulate in the attic works well.
    I am uncertain as to what you mean by "frame in stud walls", but I take it that you can not just put insulation in the existing studs then drywall over them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
    The ice is likley condensation, is it on the northern exposure?. Is you attic acess door insullated and tight? Stopping air infiltration from inside the home will reduce the moisture getting into the attic.
    Not realy "tight" just a standard interior door with a gap at the bottom. It is a northern exposure - good call.

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
    In spring consider having a couple of roof vents installed at the top of the roof, or a contrinous ridge cap vent, or a opposide side gabel end vent, or add a gabel vent fan to your existing vent- this requirest wiring . These vents let convectionlet the air out of the attic more too.
    There are the 2 roof vents in there now.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Attic Conversion

    Normally the roof space is ventilated through air coming through the small gap between the roof and the house walls. If you convert the attic this ventilation will be blocked off. You need to ensure that the converted attic is well ventilated.
    The roof joists are initially configured to hold up the roof. They will need to be removed / altered to convert the attic. This introduces the risk that the new configuration may not be strong enough to hold up the roof long term.
    Prior to conversion the function of the attic floor is primarily to be the ceiling for the upper level - the bedrooms. It does not have the load bearing capabilities of the bedroom floor - the ceiling of the ground floor. It will need to be substantially strengthed to bring it in line with the bedroom floor.

    _________________
    Hometech are spe******ts in a range of Attic Conversions Services.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •