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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Question flickering ligths in the house

    does anybody know what might cause the lights to flicker?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Houston Texas
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    Default Re: flickering ligths in the house

    1- loose wire connection somewhere
    2- loose filament in the bulb
    3- bulb not screws all the way in
    4- poor electrical supply to the house
    5- not enough amps running to the house
    6- poor grounding
    7- overloaded circuits

    Can you give us any clues as to when the lights flicker? When someone walks by? Jumping on the floor? Another appliance turns on? more so in the evenings or daytime? all the lights or just one?

  3. #3
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    Jan 2011
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    Columbiana, Alabama
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    Default Re: flickering ligths in the house

    The problem could be that your utility company installed too small a wire to your house (common); the utility company has a loose connection on the transformer or wire feeding your house or even two or three houses (check with your neighbors);you have a loose wire or connector to your ground rod(s); you have a loose connection on a receptacle that feeds the lights; you have a burned out circuit breaker or panel stab or any number of such problems.

    Save a lot of time by gathering as much information about when, where and what is turned on when this happens. This could be a very serious problem and unless the utility company admits it's their problem, you need to call an electrician.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: flickering ligths in the house

    How would a *ground* issue affect the lights? I don't see that.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: flickering ligths in the house

    Quote Originally Posted by LeonardHomes View Post
    How would a *ground* issue affect the lights? I don't see that.
    Ditto .........
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Default Re: flickering ligths in the house

    Perhaps your neighbor has a Tesla coil in his garage:



    Or some other electricity-hogging device such as a welder or a large air compressor.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: flickering ligths in the house

    A major purpose of the ground rod in a house is to stabilize the midpoint tap on the 120/240 volt feed to the house.

    If the ground rod connection is lost the 240 volt feed will not divide evenly and some circuits will receive more than 120 volts and others less than 120 volts, depending on what happens to be running at the time. Hence, flickering lights.

    This is a major cause of fried TV's,computers,stereos etc.

    thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

  8. #8
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    Default Re: flickering ligths in the house

    Quote Originally Posted by The Semi-Retired Electric View Post
    A major purpose of the ground rod in a house is to stabilize the midpoint tap on the 120/240 volt feed to the house.

    If the ground rod connection is lost the 240 volt feed will not divide evenly and some circuits will receive more than 120 volts and others less than 120 volts, depending on what happens to be running at the time. Hence, flickering lights.

    This is a major cause of fried TV's,computers,stereos etc.

    thesemi-retiredelectrician.com
    Only if there is a poor connection in the neutral wire between the transformer and the electrical panel.

    The ground rod is only for safety, to provide a drain for lightning strikes which could cause damage in the house, and to provide a safe path to ground in the event of a broken neutral wire supplying the house.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  9. #9
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    Jan 2011
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    Columbiana, Alabama
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    Default Re: flickering ligths in the house

    Yes, the ground rod(s) is/are mostly for safety but loose neutrals or melted connections are very common and the lights always flicker before the the final blow-out.

    A good grounding system can save a lot of money and lives.

    thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

  10. #10
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    Default Re: flickering ligths in the house

    Quote Originally Posted by The Semi-Retired Electric View Post
    A major purpose of the ground rod in a house is to stabilize the midpoint tap on the 120/240 volt feed to the house.
    Interesting statement . I'm curious as to an explaination of that.
    The *midpoint tap* you refer to is the center tap on the secondary side of a transformer commonly refered to as the * neutral* leg.
    The major purpose of the *ground rod* is protection for lightning , transient spikes , etc.--- has no bearing on the functionality for 120/20 feed to the house.


    If the ground rod connection is lost the 240 volt feed will not divide evenly and some circuits will receive more than 120 volts and others less than 120 volts, depending on what happens to be running at the time. Hence, flickering lights.

    This is a major cause of fried TV's,computers,stereos etc.

    thesemi-retiredelectrician.com
    What you describe is the loss of a * neutral * connection which is the center tap on the transformer secondary windings. Lifiting the earth ground won't upset the balance. The reason the 240 will not divide evenly without a *neutral* would be unequal loads on the two legs of the 240.
    Besides, thousands of North American homes still have ungrounded service just like years ago ---- without issues like you describe.

    No offense --- just saying.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

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