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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    indiana
    Posts
    1

    Default kitchen wall support

    My house is ten years old,I have arched opening leading from the family room into the kitchen. When they were putting the wall up I noticed that the wall started to sink. The workers went downstairs into the basement and put a 2x4 perpendicular on a support beam running parallel with the wooden I joist. I wasn't to confident with that so I added some floor jacks for added support. The problem is a crack appears in the drywall every year because of movement and I was wondering what was the best way to fix this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Needham, MA
    Posts
    559

    Default Re: kitchen wall support

    any chance of geting a pic of the work done in the basement and the kitchen opening? if you do post some pics, let us know where the work in the basement is done in relation to the opening in the kitchen.

    thanks

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,941

    Default Re: kitchen wall support

    Were the supports placed in the basement before or after the load was added to the floor above?

    If it is a seasonal crack appearing, that could just be the normal expansion and contraction of your home with heating and cooling cycles.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: kitchen wall support

    Quote Originally Posted by indiana randy View Post
    My house is ten years old,I have arched opening leading from the family room into the kitchen. When they were putting the wall up I noticed that the wall started to sink. The workers went downstairs into the basement and put a 2x4 perpendicular on a support beam running parallel with the wooden I joist. I wasn't to confident with that so I added some floor jacks for added support. The problem is a crack appears in the drywall every year because of movement and I was wondering what was the best way to fix this?
    Is this a bungalow or is there a second floor above? The issue can be different for the type of structure.

    For example --- generally a 10 year old bungalow likely has engineered roof trusses which eliminates the *support* walls that you find with stick framed roof/ceiling assemblies. In which case the cracking appearing with seasonal changes is likely *truss uplift*.
    Last edited by canuk; 02-14-2011 at 11:49 PM.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

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