+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    4

    Default Kitchen cabinet refinishing

    Anyone had any experiance with the Rust-olium cabinet restoration kits they sell, Or thier counter top restoration kit's?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,584

    Default Re: Kitchen cabinet refinishing

    Tom,

    I recently tested the Rust-Oleum Cabinet Restoration Kit. I dislike selling products I have little experience with. Also, I thought the price point at $80 was a little steep for someone to buy without seeing an actual sample. Foolishly, from a marketing standpoint, Rust-Oleum did not supply an actual sample with their display, only printed representations.

    It is a self contained kit with de-glosser and scrubby pads, the base coat of acrylic paint, a water based glaze finish and a clear protective top coat.

    Each kit will cover 40 linear feet of cabinets, not including the interiors, but both sides of the doors.

    The procedure is as follows:

    1. Clean and degloss cabinets with the supplied, low odor deglosser and scrubby pads.

    2. Apply two coats of the acrylic base coat.

    3. (Optional) Apply the glaze with a brush and then removed the desired amount of glaze with the supplied cheese cloth pads.

    4. Apply a coat of the clear acrylic top coat.

    I found the finished product to be quite attractive. The base coat flowed out freely, leaving a "toothy" surface which grabbed the glaze coat nicely. One concern I had is that most water based glazes dry too quickly and make wiping them difficult. I found the the glaze had sufficient wet time to allow a nice finish without having to work furiously.

    The base coat can also be thinned up to 30%, which would allow it to be sprayed with a normal pressure pot or HPLV srrayer. If, however, you intend to use the glaze, Rust-Oleum suggests you brush, rather spray the base coat.

    I have had a couple customers come back and compliment the results they got using this product. If you have oak cabinets, the glaze highlites the grain and gives an interesting look.

    I think this is a good product for someone who has older cabinets which are still providing good utility and who does not wish to go through the large expensive of cabinett re-facing or re-placement. A couple kits for $160 would give a dramatic new appearance to a good sized kitchen.

    I have no experience with the counter top paint. I can state that it has an extreme solvent odor. I would not have much faith in it for the long run, but might be OK for a couple years until the counters can be replaced. If I were going through the work of refinishing the base cabinets, I would try to replace or reface the counter tops with economical laminates or ceramic tile.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Kitchen cabinet refinishing

    I know how to sort them so the unread messages are first but I want to view only the unread so I can delete them all with out having to deselect the read ones. I have over 10k read ones and its time I don't really want to spend.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Kitchen cabinet refinishing

    I want to get the kitchen cabinets repainted (bright & airy .. removing the original paint and repaint again). Does anyone know how I go about getting this done through a professional? I mean, would a handyman do this job or a painter or home improvement services.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,584

    Angry Re: Kitchen cabinet refinishing

    Nero,

    Cabinett re-painting is kind of a specialty unto itself, but most competant housepainters can handle it. I would Google it or use the local Yellow Pages. I would not state that a handyman could not do it, but it does require some knowledge and relatively expensive equipment.

    A good craftsman will be happy to show you pictures of his past work, show samples and give references.

    If your cabinetts originally had a quality factory type finish, stripping is not generally required. Although the optimum, it will definitely add to the cost. A good cleaning, sanding and de-glossing will usually suffice.

    I am from the Old School and still prefer oil or lacquer based paint products, but in the last few years many water borne finishes have appeared. Regardless of type of finish, spraying will give by far the best finished appearance.

    I preferred to remove all doors and drawers and take them to my shop for finishing. It helped remove much of the mess and smell from the owners home and allowed me to spray in a controlled environment. The base cabinetts can be sprayed in place after extensive protection and isolation of the surrounding area. I would rig a fan to pull the vapors from the house.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •