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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    27

    Default Insulate a living room floor

    I am thinking of insulating my living room floor. My house is 140 years old on a rock foundation. This room has exterior walls on the south east and west sides. Their is one register in the north east side of the room for the heat to migrate through. The crawl space below was used for a cellar. It worked great many years ago for this. Above this room is the master bedroom so insutlating the celing would require removing dry wall. The floor is cold in the winter. It is approximately 15x15. Their is very little pipes and wiring to work around.

    Would it be worth my money to insulate the underside of the floor?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: Insulate a living room floor

    Quote Originally Posted by dennistonnate View Post
    I am thinking of insulating my living room floor. My house is 140 years old on a rock foundation. This room has exterior walls on the south east and west sides. Their is one register in the north east side of the room for the heat to migrate through. The crawl space below was used for a cellar. It worked great many years ago for this. Above this room is the master bedroom so insutlating the celing would require removing dry wall. The floor is cold in the winter. It is approximately 15x15. Their is very little pipes and wiring to work around.

    Would it be worth my money to insulate the underside of the floor?
    If the master bedroom is above the living room there would be no benefit to insulate the ceiling of the living room.

    There could be two ways to approach this.
    First would be to seal all points of air infiltration and insulate the perimeter walls of the cellar/crawlspace. This will raise the temperature within that space and help maintain a more comfortable temperature of the floor.
    The second would be simply insulating the underside of the living room floor as you mentioned. Paying particular attention to sealing any and all points of air infiltration and proper insulation of the rim joist areas.

    There is also the base of the walls in the living room which allow plenty of cold drafts cooling the floor , especially with a home of your vintage and if the walls aren't well insulated to start with. Using a caulking to seal the point where the exterior walls meet the floor will greatly help although this would require either removing the base shoe or the base board for doing this step.

    Another point you mentioned was only one heat vent for the living room. Chances are that room would be cold since there probably isn't much heat being supplied to that room to begin with.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Insulate a living room floor

    Yes!!!!

    Bat fiberglass is the cheapest way to insulate the joist bays. Heck do the entire basement ceiling. paper faced bats help stop fiberglass showering down on you so it is worth the extra minor $ an easier to install then non backed fiberglass. Got plastic on the basement floor if dirt? Adding it will keep the humidity from coming up into the basement and house ... 6 mil is the norm. Been reading about super insulation homes - appears the cold infiltrates mostly in the first 2 foot of the basement walls below grade. so i am considering also draping down my basement walls that 2 foot.
    Oh for more cost but added benefit of fire rating and air infiltration reduction is rock wool insulation Rulix Rock wool insulation bats. Have fun.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: Insulate a living room floor

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
    Yes!!!!

    Bat fiberglass is the cheapest way to insulate the joist bays. Heck do the entire basement ceiling. paper faced bats help stop fiberglass showering down on you so it is worth the extra minor $ an easier to install then non backed fiberglass. Got plastic on the basement floor if dirt? Adding it will keep the humidity from coming up into the basement and house ... 6 mil is the norm. Been reading about super insulation homes - appears the cold infiltrates mostly in the first 2 foot of the basement walls below grade. so i am considering also draping down my basement walls that 2 foot.
    Oh for more cost but added benefit of fire rating and air infiltration reduction is rock wool insulation Rulix Rock wool insulation bats. Have fun.
    That all depends on what the frost line is in your region. If your frost line is 4 feet deep that means cold infiltration is 4 feet not 2 feet.
    In our area it used to be code that basement walls were to be insulated the first 4 feet down, it was changed to be the entire height of the wall.
    Besides, many of us were doing the entire walls anyway since it wasn't much extra money and the benefits outweighed the small cost.

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