Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Swelling Drywall in Bathroom

    The master bathroom wall swells during the winter. The buldge is pronounced, and I have a 1/8-inch gap between it and the vanity and counter. During the summer, the swelling disappears, as does the gap. This wall shares an exterior wall, and has a floor register with some directional vents pointing toward it. (When the heat or AC is on, some of the air is pointed toward the wall and vanity.) The plumbing runs through the floor, and there are no obvious signs of leaking. We leave the window and door open when showering as there is not an exhaust fan in the bathroom.

    The same happens to a lesser extent in the kitchen. It, too, shares an exterior wall. Except, instead of a floor register providing a heat source, the refrigerator is on the wall. The kitchen is part of an open concept, and there is plenty of air ciculation.

    No other walls in the house which 1) share an exterior wall or 2) have a floor register with directional vents pointing toward the wall have this problem. The master bathroom wall faces east, and the kitchen wall faces north. We live in the Midwest with extreme temperature during the winter and summer.

    We would like to upgrade the kitchen counter and add a tile backspalsh, as well as upgrade the vanity and counter in the master bathroom. All of the work will be for naught if we cannot solve this problem.

    Any ideas will be greatly appreciated. With many thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Swelling Drywall in Bathroom

    It is because the drain system of your bath is not proper.
    I think that you should have a proper drain system & don,t let water to enter in the wall from bottom.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Swelling Drywall in Bathroom

    Quote Originally Posted by toobusy View Post
    The master bathroom wall swells during the winter. The buldge is pronounced, and I have a 1/8-inch gap between it and the vanity and counter. During the summer, the swelling disappears, as does the gap. This wall shares an exterior wall, and has a floor register with some directional vents pointing toward it. (When the heat or AC is on, some of the air is pointed toward the wall and vanity.) The plumbing runs through the floor, and there are no obvious signs of leaking. We leave the window and door open when showering as there is not an exhaust fan in the bathroom.

    The same happens to a lesser extent in the kitchen. It, too, shares an exterior wall. Except, instead of a floor register providing a heat source, the refrigerator is on the wall. The kitchen is part of an open concept, and there is plenty of air ciculation.

    No other walls in the house which 1) share an exterior wall or 2) have a floor register with directional vents pointing toward the wall have this problem. The master bathroom wall faces east, and the kitchen wall faces north. We live in the Midwest with extreme temperature during the winter and summer.

    We would like to upgrade the kitchen counter and add a tile backspalsh, as well as upgrade the vanity and counter in the master bathroom. All of the work will be for naught if we cannot solve this problem.

    Any ideas will be greatly appreciated. With many thanks!
    Doesn't sound like the wall *swells* but rather what you are experiencing has to do with movement. In the winter the wood contracts when it's cold --- the summer it expands when it's warm. To add to the problem you may have the framing studs with the crowns running in different directions ( one in --- one out ) which causes a wavey wall.
    It's possible there may also be an issue with poor insulation within the walls that exasperates the above mentioned.

    Your correct in holding off putting up the tile backsplash otherwise it would be sure to crack.

    It's really hard to say what to do --- really depends if your prepared to go through all the work of opening the wall to correct things --- or live with it.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Swelling Drywall in Bathroom

    Just thinking more about your issue.

    Actually this is not uncommon , although most of those problems are with new homes and wet studs. If your home is not new that tells me that somehow a lot of moisture is getting into the wall and to those studs around the counter, either from an outdoor leak, or moisture paths from the kitchen or bath room.

    What is happening is excess moisture in the wall is migrating to the cold edge of the studs and causing just that side of the stud to move, creating a bow in the wall. Because of the insulation, the indoor edge of the stud is warm, and the outside edge of the stud is freezing cold. That is no problem as long as the wood is dry. But if the wood is wet, that moisture will be drawn to the cold side and out comes the bow. In the summer, the moisture equalises out, and the bow disappears.

    Check the outside of the house for water penetration in this area, and check under the sink and anywhere else in this area for holes leading to the stud cavity. This is sometimes caused by moisture from a laundry room below finding a hole to let the moisture up into the wall. Worst case scenerio is a opening in the vapour barrier allowing enough warm moist air into the wall cavity to affect those studs.

    Block the moisture movement, and you will stop the wall movement.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •