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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    4

    Exclamation Water coming from behind the siding

    HELP

    I have a 1971 split level with a 4/12 roof line. I have owned it 2 years. The first year I had water coming in the house and from the back of the siding from a ice dam. Since then I have added insulation (Approx 24 inches)and a ridge vent. I have also put heat tape on the side of the roof with the ice dam problem. I just looked today and the problem is coming back. It is not as bad as last year but still there. I have now shovled the roof. While doing that is some areas the roof was wet under the snow. I have been thinking about putting a attic fan in to get the heat out. Not sure what else to do??????Anyone have any ideas???? Thanks Steve

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Water coming from behind the siding

    Howdy, On the roof you can have ice an water guard installed from the bottom edge of the roof slope an up at least 3' past the outside wall. Even 6' would be better . This product is made to stop ice daming from allowing water that is trapped on the roof from leaking in under and around the shingles ( capillary action of water) To install it this area of the roof is stripped to the decking and then after is re shingled...
    If the home has a higher roof above the leaking area that drains onto the lower roof( If a rain gutter drains onto the lower roof ) add down spout to direct the water away from this area.
    Inside the attic are there soffit vents in this area of the roof that leaks . Avent 1sqft for every 300 swft of attic floor space is recommended and one for every 150 sqft of attic space is better. What type and how much ridge cap or high venting does the roof have ? Again 1 sqft for every 300 as stated is the recommended...
    If less then this add more vents.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    4

    Exclamation Re: Water coming from behind the siding

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
    Howdy, On the roof you can have ice an water guard installed from the bottom edge of the roof slope an up at least 3' past the outside wall. Even 6' would be better . This product is made to stop ice daming from allowing water that is trapped on the roof from leaking in under and around the shingles ( capillary action of water) To install it this area of the roof is stripped to the decking and then after is re shingled...
    If the home has a higher roof above the leaking area that drains onto the lower roof( If a rain gutter drains onto the lower roof ) add down spout to direct the water away from this area.
    Inside the attic are there soffit vents in this area of the roof that leaks . Avent 1sqft for every 300 swft of attic floor space is recommended and one for every 150 sqft of attic space is better. What type and how much ridge cap or high venting does the roof have ? Again 1 sqft for every 300 as stated is the recommended...
    If less then this add more vents.
    I had a roofer over this last fall to install the ridge vent. He said there is plenty of venting. I have a turtle back every 4 ft I think and soffit vents every 3-4 ft. I do have one spot in the roof that melts the snow before any other spot under the bathrrom. I think it is because it gets so hot in there. I have closed the vent in there and it satys warm still. I though about adding the Ice/water but of course I have two layers of shingles on my roof. Can I take them off and add the ice and water and add the new shingles to the old? Thanks for the help Steve

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Water coming from behind the siding

    Howdy, is there a roof vent for the bathroom that extends into the attic but not out the roof? Does the bath have an exhaust fan an is is vented out side the bldg?
    Is the water leaking at the siding below the bath area you mentioned? Look in attic for water damage and note what it is near in relation to any penetrations in the roof. Also check to ensure insulation has not blocked the soffit vents.

    Two layers and installing ice and water guard. removing both layers and felt and installing the ice& water guard and new felt and new shingles to the ridge cap, peak of the roof, is the way to go. Trying to tie in two layers to a lower one layer will not perform for 20 years or look proper....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Water coming from behind the siding

    Water is coming from behind my siding too. I had to poke 2 holes in kitchen ceiling to release water that's coming from dam behind couple of clapboards. For 2 yrs. we figured roof dam but can see it now. We looked here because water not coming in room over kitchen. It's coming through kitchen ceiling. Now, I'm told that I shouldn't replace the 2-3 clapboards and what's wet behind them until winter is over. That makes no sense to me. Friends told me that. Also, I think the kitchen ceiling will have to be replaced too. But replacing the siding now may prevent further damage... I know it's very wet. My roof is totally shoveled off too. Can you advise me please? Thank you.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Water coming from behind the siding

    Howdy, a photo of the area of the exterior would help. But if the siding intersects with the roofing is there metal counter flashing behind the siding and out on top or stair stepped down with the shingles?
    Fixing the damage as soon as weather allows the repair is important to avoid more damage and rot & mold ... The kitchen ceiling may only need a repair. The insulation above it too likely needs some repair. The area behind the siding may need a water retardant membrane added is there any now?
    Last edited by Timothy Miller; 02-05-2011 at 08:54 PM. Reason: typos

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Water coming from behind the siding

    One other thing you may want to check is if you have any recessed lights in the kitchen ceiling near the roof. I'm a contractor in the Boston area and we've seen several cases where the recessed lights are close to the roof and it can be very difficult to insulate properly around the lights to prevent the heat from transferring to the roof.

    Chris Matey
    Red Apple Renovations
    www.redapplerenovations.com

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