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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    8

    Red face Trying to match wall paint

    I would like to do some touch up painting to hide some stencil marks on my LR wall, but it seems when I did that paint job about 9 years ago, I must have used up all the paint, except for a small container, in which I added some white to it, to sponge on a paint effect. I wish I would have saved some for the future if needed from that, before I mixed that much! The paint is holding up real well, and I really don't want to repaint everything and responge too. It is a medium **** color. Is it possible to take a small chip off the wall, in a non obvious place, and take it to a paint store to match it up?
    Last edited by prairierose; 01-25-2011 at 12:28 AM. Reason: mis spelling

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Trying to match wall paint

    yes it is possible, is it part of the stencil or just the wall color
    if its the wall color you can take a light switch plate off and cut the drywall paper off and take that in. most places have scanners that recognize colors and can match it to what they have in their system
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Trying to match wall paint

    Quote Originally Posted by prairierose View Post
    I would like to do some touch up painting to hide some stencil marks on my LR wall, but it seems when I did that paint job about 9 years ago, I must have used up all the paint, except for a small container, in which I added some white to it, to sponge on a paint effect. I wish I would have saved some for the future if needed from that, before I mixed that much! The paint is holding up real well, and I really don't want to repaint everything and responge too. It is a medium **** color. Is it possible to take a small chip off the wall, in a non obvious place, and take it to a paint store to match it up?
    I wanted to say **** color, but hit wrong keys. I couldn't edit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Trying to match wall paint

    I did'nt think of that! I will take off light switch cover, and take some paint from there. I don't know why I can't type in the color! It is a cross between yellow and brown. Starts with g, ends with d, ol in between! That is silly, why I can't edit the color name in! Hope this works!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,917

    Default Re: Trying to match wall paint

    Since you said its been 9 years, the color of the paint behind the light switch plate will be different than the wall paint closer to the windows, different closer to the floor, and different closer to the cielings.

    Sunlight, smoking, and cooking change paint colors unevenly throughout a room. Even if you had the same old paint name, the formula is long gone.

    Get one of those color fans from a paint supplier and, while holding it up to the area to be painted, select a color that matches best.

    The other thing to keep in mind is the way the old paint was applied to the wall. If it was rolled on the main wall, and you touch up with a brush, the marks will show as the brush gives a different finish than a roller will. This is why most pro's will repaint an entire wall to hide a repair. Its a lot harder to spot the difference between an old and new paint job at a change of plane (wall to wall corner) than mid-wall.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,736

    Default Re: Trying to match wall paint

    Alas Prairierose,

    Even if you had the original paint and it were still in good shape, it is extremely difficult to touch up and have it be invisible. There are many factors whch can influence this, several have been already been mentioned. You do not only have to match the color, but also the sheen. The wall is now better sealed than what you originally painted over. Painting over it can affect both the sheen and even the color itself.

    Ironically, one of the reasons builders like that cheap, chaulky, dead flat paint is that it touches up better than expensive premium paints. Tradesmen are always banging the walls in new homes before they go up for sale and have it has to be touched up.

    You have noting to lose by trying the touch up, but after 9 years you have gotten your money's worth from that paint job.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,940

    Default Re: Trying to match wall paint

    You're better off repainting the entire wall/room. As was stated, the paint will be dirty and faded, so even if you had some remnants to use, the touch ups would stand out like a sore thumb. Even if you were to get a good match to the dirty faded wall, your touch ups will stick out like a sore thumb. You will need to repaint the entire wall to blend the new paint to the old. As long as you stop in a corner it should be fairly unnoticeable.

    This is also why you should always keep a record of your paint brand, base tint, and color mix code so that when the need arises you can get more of the same.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

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