+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2

    Default sagging baseboard pipes?

    My husband and I recently purchased a home built in 1942. We do not know exactly when the baseboards were installed because it was originally a summer beach cottage. When we had the boiler replaced the plumber told us that the baseboard pipes were sagging, making it difficult to bleed the system. He suggested we replace them (a very expensive job).

    Has anyone else had experience with this? Is it a common problem with old baseboards? Thnx

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,359

    Default Re: sagging baseboard pipes?

    If this is a steam system, sagging pipes can cause condensate to pool in the low part, creating the same kind of condition as in your sink's P-trap. As the boiler comes on, steam pressure will build until it can blow past the water in the trap, and it will do so with a bang.

    Are you able to support the pipes so they don't sag, and have the proper slope to them? If so, that may inexpensively resolve the issue without having to replace anything. You can do that work yourself with nothing more than Plumber's Tape (metal strapping) and a few screws.

    I don't know what the proper slope is for steam pipes, but they should be sloped so that it's uphill all the way from the boiler to the radiator. If there are any low points that can't be raised to meet the proper slope, then an automatic condensate relief valve must be installed at the low point.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: sagging baseboard pipes?

    Thanks so much for your reply! We are not steam. We have hot water. We have a carpenter who helps us with our larger home projects and he said he had never heard of such a thing (he is in his mid-seventies and has been a carpenter by trade for about 50 yrs). We are novices about these things and are trying to figure out if our plumber is being honest or just making an excuse to drum up business.

    Any information is helpful.

    R.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,359

    Default Re: sagging baseboard pipes?

    I think the same principle applies with hot water systems; if you have a "low point" it can trap air in the high point just upstream of the low point, and it can be very difficult to get that air out of there. So you still want to see if you can support the pipes so they aren't sagging.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •